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The Steel Wall Queen Part Two


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Community #1 Posted 19 June 2013 - 04:41 PM

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The story of the Matilda continues in this player-submitted article.

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CrazyWelshy #2 Posted 19 June 2013 - 08:34 PM

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Cool article, wasn't the Hedgehog a naval anti-submarine weapon too?  I'd have love to see that little idea in action for the Matilda though.

Ashmodiel #3 Posted 19 June 2013 - 09:22 PM

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"The Polish Connection" part has some errors.

Well, in fact there are no "Polish connection". A11 Matilda tanks captured in France were tested in 1940 or 1941 in Poland on Rembertów military range. Several photos of captured Matildas are known and some of them were posted in short thread on Axis History Forum - http://forum.axishis....f=111&t=148581


Quote

Some sources have claimed that a single Matilda was shipped to the Polish army before the war started, but these have not been verified.
And this is myth, unfortunately repeated even in Polish publications. Of course authors of such books don't bother with providing source of such claims.


Quote

It could be that the Polish Matilda was one of these.
There are no confirmed and based on documents info about purchase and delivery of Matilda A11 tank to Poland before WWII. So there were no "Polish Matilda" at all.

I think it's good opportunity to tell a little bit about purchasing foreign tanks before WWII.

Due to the fact that production of Polish 7TP couldn't be increased and its improved variant, 9TP, could not enter production without reducing production of 7TP, Polish Army wanted to buy some foreign tanks. Excellent Somua S35 was the choice but France didn't released this tank for sale. Instead few Renault R35 and Hotchkiss R35 French tanks were purchased for tests in 1938. Military report states that French tanks had issues with overheating, had hard suspension, low speed and weak armament and were considered as poor choice. But there were no choice and Poland ordered 100 R35 in France.

Matilda A11 was even slower and was armed with machine gun only and it's clear that this tank was inferior when compared with Renault R35 and Hotchkiss R35. Why anyone would like to waste time and test tank worse than tanks already considered to be poor?

Last but not least - first batch of R35 tanks was delivered to Poland in July 1939 and Polish Army was not interested in purchase obsolete tanks.

Chuffy #4 Posted 20 June 2013 - 12:21 AM

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A great pair of Articles and a very enjoyable read. Thanks Listy  :great:

BP_OMowe #5 Posted 20 June 2013 - 01:36 AM

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View PostAshmodiel, on 19 June 2013 - 09:22 PM, said:

"The Polish Connection" part has some errors.
And this is myth, unfortunately repeated even in Polish publications. Of course authors of such books don't bother with providing source of such claims.
There are no confirmed and based on documents info about purchase and delivery of Matilda A11 tank to Poland before WWII. So there were no "Polish Matilda" at all.

I think it's good opportunity to tell a little bit about purchasing foreign tanks before WWII.
Matilda A11 was even slower and was armed with machine gun only and it's clear that this tank was inferior when compared with Renault R35 and Hotchkiss R35. Why anyone would like to waste time and test tank worse than tanks already considered to be poor?
Last but not least - first batch of R35 tanks was delivered to Poland in July 1939 and Polish Army was not interested in purchase obsolete tanks.

There are no errors per se in "The Polish Connection", as it clearly states that the story is unconfirmed. Omitting it would be an error though, as it appears to be widespread and thus needs to be addressed if for no other purpose to inform about the dubious status.

As for the purchase procedures you describe, they are not in line with what for instance FMV in Sweden does. Foreign vehicles are tested on a regular basis not just to find a "winner", but also to gain knowledge of the overall development internationally. The A11 might have been slower, but that alone doesn't mean it's a bad tank if it had other merits to compensate with. Machinegun as main armament would not be a problem either provided the turret could accept an adequate gun without major modifications. A single machine for testing purposes would have revealed this, as well as given insight in not just the construction of the vehicle itself but also it's intended use, and as we all are well aware of how a weapon is used is as important as the specifications.

Listy #6 Posted 20 June 2013 - 02:21 AM

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View PostChuffy, on 20 June 2013 - 12:21 AM, said:

A great pair of Articles and a very enjoyable read. Thanks Listy  :great:

Thanks, I try to keep you lot entertained.



By the way, Overlord has invited me to put stuff up on his blog. That will be more general history, unlike the WOT website, which will be tank articles only.

Golem501 #7 Posted 21 June 2013 - 01:11 PM

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Can I get that Hedgehog modification on my Matilda please? *PRETTY PLEASE???* /puppy-eyes/

The Hedgehog mounted an armoured box that could be carried flat against the hull. A hydraulic system elevated this box into a launching position. The box contained seven spigot mortar rounds, each shot weighing 65 pounds. The tank was pointed at the enemy and the required numbers of projectiles were fired. Each projectile carried twice as much explosive than the KV-2's 152mm howitzer, so their effect on hitting a bunker can only be assumed to be devastating.

sword_of_Damocles #8 Posted 21 June 2013 - 01:19 PM

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Nice reading Listy!Thanks! :great:

A_Headless_Chicken #9 Posted 10 July 2013 - 08:44 AM

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good stuff listy, great little read

Orangeminus #10 Posted 10 July 2013 - 01:48 PM

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View PostGolem501, on 21 June 2013 - 01:11 PM, said:

The Hedgehog mounted an armoured box that could be carried flat against the hull. A hydraulic system elevated this box into a launching position. The box contained seven spigot mortar rounds, each shot weighing 65 pounds. The tank was pointed at the enemy and the required numbers of projectiles were fired. Each projectile carried twice as much explosive than the KV-2's 152mm howitzer, so their effect on hitting a bunker can only be assumed to be devastating.

Fun weapon but doesn't beat the Sherman Caliope

Posted Image

Which actually saw combat

Edited by Orangeminus, 10 July 2013 - 01:54 PM.


Listy #11 Posted 11 July 2013 - 06:02 PM

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View PostOrangeminus, on 10 July 2013 - 01:48 PM, said:

Fun weapon but doesn't beat the Sherman Caliope

Which actually saw combat

...as an artillery weapon used en mass to precede an attack. If you want a direct fire weapon that saw service, try a Tulip.




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