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Pudding, WTF?


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Dan_Abnormal #1 Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:43 PM

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So, Tea and Pudding, tea I can understand as any sane Englishman would, I drink gallons of the stuff. But pudding, WTF is that all about?

It can have about three different meanings depending on which part of the country you're from, none of which go with tea, who did they ask when implementing this, or did they not bother?

Yes I know I'm probably 12 months out of date, but I'm all out of care.

lavaboy #2 Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:46 PM

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View PostDan_Abnormal, on 09 December 2013 - 08:43 PM, said:

So, Tea and Pudding, tea I can understand as any sane Englishman would, I drink gallons of the stuff. But pudding, WTF is that all about?

It can have about three different meanings depending on which part of the country you're from, none of which go with tea, who did they ask when implementing this, or did they not bother?

Yes I know I'm probably 12 months out of date, but I'm all out of care.

Yeah you're right of course (although very late to the party as you admit).

Personally Tea and Pudding is all wrong as far as I'm concerned, more fitting for the average Brit these days would be Coffee and Prozac

Captain_Karpov #3 Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:47 PM

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A full English, is nothing if black pudding is not present. But I don't think this is what WG have in mind, I think they are thinking of spotted dick and jam roly poly.

brokenbits #4 Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:50 PM

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Tea and biscuits, maybe a cheeky Jaffa Cake, but maybe tea and pudding was a thing back in the old days when game is set

lavaboy #5 Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:51 PM

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Saw a documentary about the desert war, and when the Brits were low on supplies and knew they were coming up to a big scrap, they issued a rum ration to the tank corps to steel the nerves, so is "rum and sweetFA" a more histroically accurate consumable to have in the game?

WoTDaFoCh #6 Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:52 PM

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Yorkshire pudding.....freakin awesome invention  :trollface:
Posted Image

Edited by BigBadEnglishUK, 09 December 2013 - 08:54 PM.


Kdingo #7 Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:53 PM

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Great, now im hungry.... again.

NLForTheBest #8 Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:57 PM

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We usually eat pudding here in holland so there is something going wrong :)

Homer_J #9 Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:57 PM

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My theory is it is a bad translation, and should be cake.

Cup of tea and a slice of cake, just like Wurzel Gummage.

Dan_Abnormal #10 Posted 09 December 2013 - 09:09 PM

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View PostHomer_J, on 09 December 2013 - 08:57 PM, said:

My theory is it is a bad translation, and should be cake.

Cup of tea and a slice of cake, just like Wurzel Gummage.

That was my thinking also, I think it's supposed to be cake.

View PostNLForTheBest, on 09 December 2013 - 08:57 PM, said:


We usually eat pudding here in holland so there is something going wrong :)

It's not so much the "pudding" as to which sort of f**king pudding, we have about four or five different meanings. Even the word is ambiguous because depending where you're from pudding can be a dish as well as describing dessert - "What's for pudding mam?"  - "Cake son, now sit back down before I clip yer tab"

LekkerBezig #11 Posted 09 December 2013 - 10:13 PM

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Ì think they meant Black Pudding..... which is tier X pudding  :trollface:

OIias_of_Sunhillow #12 Posted 09 December 2013 - 10:33 PM

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An outsiders, mistaken, stereotypical, view of your typical Englishman.

However, should an Englishman voice his view of a typical Frenchman, or a German, or God forbid, a Polish guy, all
hell will break loose.

Wanna see my double-headed coin ?

Pandabird #13 Posted 10 December 2013 - 03:31 AM

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The englishmen go gunnin'

stronk and alert

Cos they got awesome puddin',

A pro hax dessert

Cos when your in Matilda

And eager for a treat

You might just get tad warmer

with something nice and sweet
"some tea with that chap?"
Now don't go spreadin' rumours
That the picture looks all fake
puddin' ain't always jello
it's also a damn fine cake

Edited by Pandabird, 10 December 2013 - 03:44 AM.


Norrin_Radd #14 Posted 10 December 2013 - 04:40 AM

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Well being a sensible brit, although not old enough to have been their, I used trusty google and found this
http://www.telegraph...-WW1-Tommy.html
And in there was this.

Quote

Although there was no rat-au-van, there were some now largely forgotten dishes, such as beef tea, mutton broth, brawn, potato pie and duff pudding.
Now since I doubt there are many 120 Y/O people playing this game would it not be better to do a simple google search BEFORE posting something which is supposed to show WG up for getting it wrong but ends up making OP look like a fool?
OH and no I have no idea what duff pudding is and no interest in finding out.

Edited by Norrin_Radd, 10 December 2013 - 04:41 AM.


Homer_J #15 Posted 10 December 2013 - 10:47 AM

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View PostNorrin_Radd, on 10 December 2013 - 04:40 AM, said:


Now since I doubt there are many 120 Y/O people playing this game would it not be better to do a simple google search BEFORE posting something which is supposed to show WG up for getting it wrong but ends up making OP look like a fool?
OH and no I have no idea what duff pudding is and no interest in finding out.

You don't need to be 120 years old to know what plum duff is.

Must have been written by a southerner, you can easily still get brawn up here.

soolerman #16 Posted 10 December 2013 - 09:50 PM

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It should be Tea & Duff. Duff has the same meaning as grub and means nice food of all kinds. But I suspect it all got lost in translation.

When I first noticed the Tea & Pudding thing it had me falling out my chair laughing. For you none Brits that don't know. Tea & Pudding is old slang for F^cking. Defiantly not what wg intended. I hope.

TrailApe #17 Posted 11 December 2013 - 12:31 PM

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Until very recently (well 10yrs ago) the standard 10 man ration pack had tins of 'pudding'

The contents varied over the years but you could get Ginger Pudding, Chocolate Pudding Rich-Fruit Pudding and others.

Really stodgy and filling.

There was also steak and kidney pudding, but that was not a pudding.

And rolling the timeline even further back (this from wiki)

Quote

Although the possibility of packing the B ration in units of ten was suggested early in the Second World War, progress on such an arrangement did not begin until 1943 when the Mountain, Jungle, and 5-in-1 rations were discontinued. The success of the British "compo" or 14-in-1 ration during the North African campaign in 1942 and the movement to classify field rations into four categories added incentive for development of the 10-in-1 ration.

blah blah blah (that's me not wiki)

A typical menu included such canned items as butter-substitute spread, soluble coffee, pudding, meat units, jam, evaporated milk, and vegetables as well as biscuits, cereal, beverages, candy, salt, and sugar. Accessory items were cigarettes, matches, can opener, toilet paper, soap, towels, and water-purification (Halazone) tablets

So not a translation problem more of a military terminology problem.

Effing_Drako #18 Posted 12 December 2013 - 12:24 AM

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Just give me some tea and crumpets




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