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I just want to share this piece of poetry.


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Bichri001 #1 Posted 19 February 2014 - 12:58 PM

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"I told my mother i was going to see Elefants, Tigers and Panthers. She thought i was visiting Moscow zoo" - unknown russian soldier

I don't know if this is true, but still it reaches me on many levels, I hope it does the same to you.

Have a nice day:honoring:


Soft_Kitty_Warm_Kitty #2 Posted 19 February 2014 - 01:24 PM

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View PostBichri001, on 19 February 2014 - 11:58 AM, said:

"I told my mother i was going to see Elefants, Tigers and Panthers. She thought i was visiting Moscow zoo" - unknown russian soldier

I don't know if this is true, but still it reaches me on many levels, I hope it does the same to you.

Have a nice day:honoring:

 

Could have been a poem from many countries :sad: 

 

+1, for all those that paid the ultimate sacrifice

 



TrailApe #3 Posted 19 February 2014 - 04:12 PM

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This poem is from a comedy on TV, however throughout the series (Blackadder Goes Forth) the wastefulness and tragedy of WW1 was dealt with. Obviously it's not on the same level as Auden or Sasoon, but it does have an honesty about it.

 

 Baldrick's poem -  'The German Guns'.

 

Boom, Boom, Boom, Boom,
Boom, Boom, Boom,
Boom, Boom, Boom, Boom,
Boom, Boom, Boom.


Soft_Kitty_Warm_Kitty #4 Posted 19 February 2014 - 04:49 PM

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View PostTrailApe, on 19 February 2014 - 03:12 PM, said:

This poem is from a comedy on TV, however throughout the series (Blackadder Goes Forth) the wastefulness and tragedy of WW1 was dealt with. Obviously it's not on the same level as Auden or Sasoon, but it does have an honesty about it.

 

 Baldrick's poem -  'The German Guns'.

 

Boom, Boom, Boom, Boom,
Boom, Boom, Boom,
Boom, Boom, Boom, Boom,
Boom, Boom, Boom.

 

Everybody loves Blackadder and I am not much of a poet but I do have the collected works of Wilfred Owen on my Kindle, all very touching for an old ex squaddie like me and keeps me grounded, especially on occasion when other life problems intervene and then I just re-read some of them and think, its not so bad.



exterminator996 #5 Posted 19 February 2014 - 05:06 PM

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I understand tigers and panthers, but elephants?????:child:

YBH #6 Posted 19 February 2014 - 05:10 PM

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Soft_Kitty_Warm_Kitty #7 Posted 19 February 2014 - 05:11 PM

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View Postexterminator996, on 19 February 2014 - 04:06 PM, said:

I understand tigers and panthers, but elephants?????:child:

 

The German Ferdinand also was an Elephant at first but due to the lack of a close support MG, they took a lot of casualty's at Kursk (they were also notoriously unreliable), they were redesigned slightly to cut a long story short and called a Ferdinand but they were an Elephant first. :great:

 

 


Edited by PaganWarrior, 19 February 2014 - 05:11 PM.


YBH #8 Posted 19 February 2014 - 05:15 PM

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"In September 1943 all surviving Ferdinands were recalled to be modified based on battle experience gained in the Battle of Kursk. During October and November 1943, 48 of the 50 surviving vehicles were modified by addition of a ball-mounted MG 34 in the hull front (to improve anti-infantry ability), a commander's cupola (modified from the standard StuG III cupola) for improved vision and the application of Zimmerit paste. The frontal armor was thickened and the tracks widened; these changes increased the weight from 65 to 70 t. The improved vehicles were called Elefant and this became the official name by Hitler's orders of May 1, 1944.[citation needed] Possibly as a stopgap before the Elefant modifications were available for the original Ferdinand vehicles, the rarely seen Krummlauf curved barrel upgrade for the Sturmgewehr 44 assault rifle was allegedly meant to allow crews of Ferdinands to defend their vehicle without exposing themselves. Three Bergepanzer Tiger or Bergetiger armoured recovery vehicles were built in Autumn 1943 from Tiger prototypes and one battle-damaged Ferdinand not suitable for the Elefant modification was converted into a Rammpanzer Tiger or Rammtiger, an experimental breakthrough vehicle."

exterminator996 #9 Posted 19 February 2014 - 05:15 PM

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Thanks for the info guys, i can't belive i didn't know ferdi has another name:hiding:

Soft_Kitty_Warm_Kitty #10 Posted 19 February 2014 - 05:20 PM

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View PostYBH, on 19 February 2014 - 04:15 PM, said:

"In September 1943 all surviving Ferdinands were recalled to be modified based on battle experience gained in the Battle of Kursk. During October and November 1943, 48 of the 50 surviving vehicles were modified by addition of a ball-mounted MG 34 in the hull front (to improve anti-infantry ability), a commander's cupola (modified from the standard StuG III cupola) for improved vision and the application of Zimmerit paste. The frontal armor was thickened and the tracks widened; these changes increased the weight from 65 to 70 t. The improved vehicles were called Elefant and this became the official name by Hitler's orders of May 1, 1944.[citation needed] Possibly as a stopgap before the Elefant modifications were available for the original Ferdinand vehicles, the rarely seen Krummlauf curved barrel upgrade for the Sturmgewehr 44 assault rifle was allegedly meant to allow crews of Ferdinands to defend their vehicle without exposing themselves. Three Bergepanzer Tiger or Bergetiger armoured recovery vehicles were built in Autumn 1943 from Tiger prototypes and one battle-damaged Ferdinand not suitable for the Elefant modification was converted into a Rammpanzer Tiger or Rammtiger, an experimental breakthrough vehicle."

 

A much better summary than my poor attempt by memory :trollface:



Ghostly_Poltergeist #11 Posted 19 February 2014 - 07:00 PM

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Little Poem for you all New-Comers

 

You've Registers, Signed up and selected your first Nation

Now its time to enter your first battle and feel a sense of Elation

Your fingers are poised ready to deliver your first fatal Critical Shot

You carefully stalk your first target trying to find his Weak Spot

Bang, your first Shell flies directly over the battlefield towards your Enemy

His tank explodes into a broken piece of metal and the Crew get transported Heavenly

You see the vibrant color of Orange 'your first kill' illuminate at the Side

Dam quick you've been spotted and you must now run and Hide

So you drive behind a Bush and then a Rock

Waiting and waiting, whats that 1 minute left on the Clock

Quickly you run and capture the Flag

And the best part is you didn't encounter any Lag

The game then abruptly Ends

Its bad luck for the Reds but your team are all now happy mutual Friends

The battle has been a resounding success

Now its time to return to the Results, look at your score and shout 'Yesss'

 

hope you enjoyed it :)



TrailApe #12 Posted 20 February 2014 - 02:48 PM

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Quote

Everybody loves Blackadder and I am not much of a poet but I do have the collected works of Wilfred Owen on my Kindle, all very touching for an old ex squaddie like me and keeps me grounded, especially on occasion when other life problems intervene and then I just re-read some of them and think, it’s not so bad.

 

Yeah, poetry can be scoffed at, but it’s a superb medium to get thoughts across. The war poets of all eras have put out some powerful stuff. They can combine the emotional side of war with the grim realities.

 

Here’s one of my favorites.

 

The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner

 

From my mother's sleep I fell into the State,

 And I hunched in its belly till my wet fur froze.

 Six miles from earth, loosed from its dream of life,

 I woke to black flak and the nightmare fighters.

 When I died they washed me out of the turret with a hose.

 

Randall Jarrell



ireny #13 Posted 20 February 2014 - 02:50 PM

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You have a big +1 from me...I could only imagine these words coming out my mouth and my mother's reaction...Tears...




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