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WoT and video games in the near future?


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Kahneolus #1 Posted 20 April 2014 - 12:39 PM

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What do you guys think will be the forces shaping video games during the coming years?

We've seen how far Wargaming has come via this free to play medium and how they'v even infringed onto the console market...
Is this the way forward for games, what will decide the future?


2Tee2 #2 Posted 20 April 2014 - 12:59 PM

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streaming/server side rendering, oculus rift etc ...neither seems to fit the WGs niche nicely

Lil_Chewieezy #3 Posted 20 April 2014 - 01:00 PM

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This has been the future of gaming for the past 6 years or so already, absolutely nothing new.

 

Due to the success of F2P games (if the developers aren't a disaster, like Bioware with their SWTOR, GW 2's B2P and increasingly more aggressive cashop practices that started from day 1 of its release making it end up looking as a F2P scam with terrible support and development), almost all developers are making online games with very low costs (talking mostly about costs for the player, but production costs are also lower, the initial monetary and time investments are way lower since they're made to shape up after multiple years of continuous development) and convenient things that one might like to buy.

 

This already old practice opened new doors for new developers or developers short on money with alpha funding, with both good and bad, good because unique projects are being realized through more exposure to even the most obscure games and the bad side, because now every random guy thinks his pos game deserves to be made and twisting some things to make games seem like they might actually be good when they couldn't be further away from that isn't such a big deal for them despite basically scamming people for their money and some dropping the projects for good and even being aggressive towards their paying customers for daring to ask for what they paid (seems to be a way more popular practice than it should lately).

 

And it also gave birth to DLC spam on games from big developers that also started focusing more on multiplayer, if some DLCs were brought to this earth by consoles, the massive DLC spam, season passes and such are all because they saw F2P games make people pay constantly and gave them the courage to assume some people are dumb enough to throw money at them for the worst and most pointless crap they can possibly develop because there will always be some money earned from anything.

 

Or, in another format:

F2P was already a thing since last decade.

Because of that:

Sht big name developers scam people with terrible online games that instantly go F2P to keep a few players or die out because they refuse to accept their game is crap and it deserves no money for a sub.

All big name developers treat their expensive games as a service with countless "expensive" DLCs that unless bought won't give the complete game experience for most of the games, especially for some that have their content cut way before release and spread across multiple DLCs.

Even the most niche small budget games get exposure these days.

 

The only big change gaming will suffer is at least a decade away with game streaming, which will remove the need for a strong PC to play anything, being able to play PC games or w/e even on phones, I however won't be using such services when the world will be able to sustain such technology, I'm sure it will cost a lot to just "rent" games for a while while also having to pay for accessing the service. VR tech and such is bs in its current form, just as it was in the 90's, a niche thing that won't become popular due to how inconvenient it is, real VR is probably decades away.


Edited by Chewiezohrr, 20 April 2014 - 01:04 PM.


Kahneolus #4 Posted 20 April 2014 - 08:41 PM

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Well said.

I'm also thinking that Oculus is a gimmick. It doesn't matter that John Carmack has his name behind this... he was and always will be, for me, the FPS father.

 

Speaking of all the deceit and scams/failures has made me think... Minecraft has opened a door that John Carmack first catered for. When Carmack made his games easily 'modable'... the community around them exploded. So is this partly why Minecraft is so popular? Should game manufacturers stop layering nice graphics on a bad game? There are countless examples of games with simple graphics outclassing games with state of the art graphics. I'm not saying that there aren't those gems that have both. ;)



Sapaki #5 Posted 20 April 2014 - 10:12 PM

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OP since you seem to be ineterested in Computer games and where they are headed, you might want to check out the weekly videos from "Extra Credits" on youtube. These guys know video-games and are in their 7th season or something. 

 

Take a look, they are really worth it!



Kahneolus #6 Posted 20 April 2014 - 11:18 PM

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Awesome, cheers! :)

More iiiinput! :p

PsYCho2244 #7 Posted 21 April 2014 - 12:10 AM

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WT will come WOT will go :)

Sapaki #8 Posted 21 April 2014 - 09:47 AM

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View PostKahneolus, on 20 April 2014 - 11:18 PM, said:

Awesome, cheers! :)

More iiiinput! :p

 

 

Gimme feedback as to wheteher you liked "Extra Credits". I am always curious to know if someone else than me likes these guys...



badgr_ #9 Posted 21 April 2014 - 10:04 AM

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View PostSapaki, on 21 April 2014 - 10:47 AM, said:

Gimme feedback as to wheteher you liked "Extra Credits". I am always curious to know if someone else than me likes these guys...

 

^ Anyone with the slightest interest in the games industry (not just playing games, but further into the industry) needs to have EC in their lives. I've watched the series since very early on, and it's invaluable data. James Portnow is the Neo of the current gaming industry, and is actually willing to share his knowledge - unlike many of the industry professionals that offer consultancy to larger corporations - for free.

 

Seriously... he's Neo. Looks just like Keanu Reeves...

Spoiler

 

As for where the industry is headed... who knows? Something might come along to change the face of gaming. Who'd have thought that Wii Fit would sell a million units in the first month alone? Who would have figured that a game where you click on vegetable patches in a really simple Facebook game would be one of the biggest social games of all time? Whodathunk Flappy Bird would ever have been a thing?

 

We're surprised constantly with the games industry. Predicting its future isn't quite so easy, but the trends are definitely forming. Monthly subscription models are now a thing of the past and you will generally wince when a new title is released as subscription-based... and count the time before it goes free-to-play, early-alpha funded games are commonplace, kickstarter came and went (mostly), and the free to play model is being adopt by everyone since it's currently the best model for consumers and developers.

 

Free to play done right is the best for all involved, I believe. It's still evolving as a business model, so may experience some changes in the near future. Quick cash-ins I'm not so much a fan of (read as: too many zombie games.)



Kahneolus #10 Posted 21 April 2014 - 10:48 AM

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In essence, it reminds me of the Freeware system Apogee software implemented in the early 90's. It allowed them to do everything in house but crucially players could 'test' a game before paying for them. Although different to the free to play + dlc model, I do see similar patterns in their functionality.

Sapaki, It may be a day or two (got mates around atm) but I definitely will. :)

Hummus #11 Posted 21 April 2014 - 11:54 AM

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Multi-core support !

That's the future of gaming ......    Oh wait.

 

 



Sapaki #12 Posted 21 April 2014 - 11:00 PM

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View PostDakiras, on 21 April 2014 - 10:04 AM, said:

 

^ Anyone with the slightest interest in the games industry (not just playing games, but further into the industry) needs to have EC in their lives. I've watched the series since very early on, and it's invaluable data. James Portnow is the Neo of the current gaming industry, and is actually willing to share his knowledge - unlike many of the industry professionals that offer consultancy to larger corporations - for free.

 

 

I have also followed them since very early on, discovered them by chance, even if I was not part of the gaming industry... Back at the time I was also considering a major career turn and nearly applied for an opening at WG Paris! lel!

 

I am into games, yes, but more importantly I am into games "philisophy" because I think the potential vs. creativity ratio is still VERY underdeveloped in the industry. That's why when something really "fresh" pops up (kind of like WoT did) it just swoops everything and everyone is left wondering why... But this is a looooooooong discussion that I will probably open if the topic derails towards the good directions it seems to be going...

 

Most of what Portnow says is common sense, surprizingly most of the industry seriously lacks some... I respect him a lot for putting this into the public sphere, since he genuinely beleives that what he is doing can make a difference and help towards improving the industry he loves so much. 

 

Kudos to him for that!



Dutchmul #13 Posted 21 April 2014 - 11:24 PM

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View PostHummus, on 21 April 2014 - 10:54 AM, said:

Multi-core support !

That's the future of gaming ......    Oh wait.

 

 

 

And well tested, optimised and implemented patches......oh wait



Kahneolus #14 Posted 22 April 2014 - 10:15 AM

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Sapaki, that channel is just the ticket! ;)

It's useful as the purpose of this thread is for a University assignment. The module is Games and Virtual Environments and is based on Ludology... so a lot of what the vids on that channel cover. I'm a mature student and so had a wider choice of games to choose for studying throughout the year of which I picked Quake and Half-Life... both are industry changers in their own right.

It's nice to have some people educated on the matter present in this thread, as I tried posting on another forum that shall remain anonymous, :sceptic:, and I had about 5 replies that included replies such as... NSA :facepalm:
Although I'm sure they are an influencing force and we know the US Army has influenced and/or commissioned(?) games as a recruitment tool, I don't believe they are the main force or drive.

 

How I've changed will be due to my growing up as well as games moving on, so it's hard to say with an unbiased view... but I can't remember the last time I got a "hard copy" of a game. So I feel the main force so far has been the internet and the ever increasing speed it offers. This hints towards streaming although I personally prefer to have the game on my PC because where I live, the speed isn't always smooth. So I can't see that taking over any time soon as I'm sure others are in the same boat. What is my main staple is Humble Bundle, Steam Sales, Free 2 Play... and these are just on the PC platform!

I did an essay on new media last year where I actually noted that there isn't just the stereotypical gamer anymore. You look at the parents waiting for their kids outside the school and you'll find a lot of them are "gamers" as they're playing Candy Crush or whatever else. Anyone with a smart phone is potentially a gamer.
So how can we safely estimate the forces? If I were to summarise it as a whole, I'd have to say that technology is the main driving force as it always has been. That's not to say all games are going to be state of the art, no... Flappy Bird was mentioned by Dakiras and that game played on simplicity and people's competitiveness. Alas this ruined one of the Need For Speed games for me, in that every time I logged on it told me which friends beat which times.... so I spent more time re-beating them than progressing the storyline and ended up combating that by just not playing it anymore. Schrödinger's Cat.... did they beat me or did my score still stand? Didn't matter if I didn't know. However, technology gives games new possibilities which are "fresh" and that is what sells. Whether the possibilities be graphics or processing or simply portability and convenience... tech played a part in some way. Flappy bird? Tech helped simplify game making so that more indie games are made... see? Not necessarily high end tech ;)

 

Aaaahhhh yes as you said... a long and ongoing convo indeed! :p

 



badgr_ #15 Posted 23 April 2014 - 10:55 AM

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Hey Kahneolus,

 

I've dropped this into off-topic for you. If the conversation continues, I'll try and drop back in and post my own thoughts on it. :) It's a topic close to my heart, and obviously my career, so it's of great interest to me!

 

Also, good luck on the module you're working on! :)



Red_Dragon_Firkraag #16 Posted 23 April 2014 - 11:05 AM

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View PostChewiezohrr, on 20 April 2014 - 02:00 PM, said:

The only big change gaming will suffer is at least a decade away with game streaming, which will remove the need for a strong PC to play anything, being able to play PC games or w/e even on phones, I however won't be using such services when the world will be able to sustain such technology, I'm sure it will cost a lot to just "rent" games for a while while also having to pay for accessing the service. VR tech and such is bs in its current form, just as it was in the 90's, a niche thing that won't become popular due to how inconvenient it is, real VR is probably decades away.

At least a century away, to be more precise, because we already see the rise of pseudo-"flatrates" with data limits and how ISPs and transit networks are trending to do away with network neutrality (One reason why World of Tanks, World of Warcraft and Diablo 3 are suffering from lag and packet loss). Streamed gaming is not possible without a fast, reliable, neutral and unlimited network. And such a network has yet to exist (not even South Korea's Gigabit network connections are neutral (IPTV is banned, for example)).

 

While putting the communication networks into the hands of private companies may have accelerated the technology spreading and researching, it is bad for the customer because those companies will exploit their position to the full potential.

 

And I must say that the BigWorld Engine implementation for both World of Tanks and World of Warplanes is very easy on data (8 kbyte/s max) which is a big plus towards customers who don't get a truly free (free as in no limits content and data wise) internet connection.

 

We need a new human right: The right to be treated equally in sending and receiving information regardless of the type of information, the content, the length, the number of fragments, the frequency of the transportation of fragments, the receiver, the sender and the total count of sent and received information.


Edited by AuRon_The_Grey, 23 April 2014 - 11:11 AM.


Yag0 #17 Posted 23 April 2014 - 11:28 AM

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View PostAuRon_The_Grey, on 23 April 2014 - 11:05 AM, said:

 

We need a new human right: The right to be treated equally in sending and receiving information regardless of the type of information, the content, the length, the number of fragments, the frequency of the transportation of fragments, the receiver, the sender and the total count of sent and received information.

 

Well I wouldn't wait for that!



Kahneolus #18 Posted 24 April 2014 - 08:56 AM

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So we can count the internet as out of bounds. With ISPs throttling users connections and us not even having near enough fibre optic coverage, it's not something we can really count on. I mean, we are still only on a handful of HD TV channels fgs. -_-

 

I've covered technology which would have the VR in there, but I think that'll be as popular as the Kinect. The Oculus has good marketing (until Facebook stepped in?) but, like the 90's, I think it'll be a passing fad. I don't see it being a stable gaming device... well, just like 3D television technology turned out. It's there for me to use but I still prefer normal 1080p movies.

 

Sticking with PC's we can be sure that the mouse and keyboard setup won't have any major overhauls... It's just an effective Human Computer Interface that works. Screen tech wise, I mean... I have a 2560 x 1440 which leaves 1080p standing in it's tracks. With screens like this being available from £300, I'm wondering why more people don't have them and then also why retail is still sitting on 1080p screens.

 

That brings another point forward. Although I said I buy all my games online, would you think retail controls the games market? I should be thinking of the Steam store as retail too which means that they are. The games that go on offer, the games that are greenlit, the games that get front page coverage... even simpler, the games that are on Steam. I'd think game devs, like musicians, are influenced by existing games. So if Steam has majority control of gamers this would give games more coverage and thus possibly influence the game devs. Also, if devs take current game popularity into account, are certain game play stats altered by their ease of use on Steam? (I'll stop saying Steam.... damn).

Hmmm... I can say that I worked for a retailer for several years and sorry to say this, but the Top 10, Top 20 charts.... they're mostly made up. Interpret that as you will.

 

What other forces are out there that have not been mentioned?

Social acceptance and responsibilities? Games get criticised more readily for their content than movies. Sexism, violence.... ever notice how the tank crew in WoT don't *die* when the tank explodes? The voice mentions they get out. (And dead crew are cured by a bandage.... so are they just injured?) Tank warfare was gruesome but it saves WoT coming under fire (pardon the pun). This is an influence whether you like it or not... although for the most part it's a positive influence. Would WoT be better for you if burning people came jumping out of the tanks, screaming and writhing in pain? Would you feel better if you saw body parts blowing out of the tank? No... the game is faster as it doesn't have to process death animations and it's more playable... no distractions.






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