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Times of War: Tobruk, Episode 4


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Community #1 Posted 07 February 2015 - 03:21 PM

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Settle in for the second part of Arthur's story - the fourth episode of our new, short-fiction series.

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TeslaDogy02 #2 Posted 09 February 2015 - 10:52 AM

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who is the author??

The_Challenger #3 Posted 09 February 2015 - 05:24 PM

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View PostTeslaDogy02, on 09 February 2015 - 09:52 AM, said:

who is the author??

 

  One of the content team.

sockpuppetSCOT #4 Posted 10 February 2015 - 03:12 PM

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Great series, keep it going guys :great:

Erissa #5 Posted 10 February 2015 - 03:32 PM

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View Postsockpuppet_, on 10 February 2015 - 02:12 PM, said:

Great series, keep it going guys :great:

 

Glad you like them! :) I'll make sure to pass your feedback to our content team!:)

Tonanti216 #6 Posted 11 February 2015 - 12:29 PM

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A nicely written story but there was one thing that kept nagging at me.  I have been to Libya and Tobruk in particular and I can't recall any soft sand or sand dune like places.  All I can remember is concrete hard scrub sand that we had to use pneumatic drills to make holes for tent pins!  There was plenty of dust and in the heat of the summer great clouds of hot most sand would blow from the south towards to coast getting into every part of our vehicles, tents and our bodies!!  I had sand in my ears and it felt like every other orifice after one of these storms.  Open Land Rovers would need to be cleared of sand so that we could get our feet on the pedals.  The armour (Centurians and FV 432's seemed to manage to stay free of sand inside).  My greatest fun was driving an International Half Track from a really sandy spot back to our base at a place called Timimi when most of my driving was undertaken standing up as the seat was too hard on thebackside with all the bouncing around over the hard desert.  When I took my cap and goggles off I looked like a Panda.  The cemetary at Accroma (Knightbridge Box) is a truly emotional spot.  It is tranquil and as you cross through the arched gateway I am sure the temperature drops a degree or two.  When I visited there was lush grass in small area that was tended by an elderly Arab.

 The three hour drive from Tobruk to TImimi was interesting too, with several WW2 trench lines and bunkers visible.  Some of these with cartoons drawn on the "walls" and other left overs.   Huge piles of banding wire were often seen as well as the British petrol containers that were used before Jerry cans.

Mines were still very evident and many exploded with dire consequences to camels and roving donkeys as well as some near misses with we soldiers who were inquisitive enough to fiddle once too  often.   I watched the disposal of a very small Anti-Personnel mine that had clearly been left on top of something much larger.  The resulting explosion was like a nuclear bomb going off with a  huge mushrom cloud of Libyan dust and sand that had us trying to outrun the stone laden downpour, unsucessfully!

 

Anyway, his story is still good if a bit romantic.

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The_Challenger #7 Posted 11 February 2015 - 08:29 PM

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View PostTonanti216, on 11 February 2015 - 11:29 AM, said:

A nicely written story but there was one thing that kept nagging at me.  I have been to Libya and Tobruk in particular and I can't recall any soft sand or sand dune like places.  All I can remember is concrete hard scrub sand that we had to use pneumatic drills to make holes for tent pins!  There was plenty of dust and in the heat of the summer great clouds of hot most sand would blow from the south towards to coast getting into every part of our vehicles, tents and our bodies!!  I had sand in my ears and it felt like every other orifice after one of these storms.  Open Land Rovers would need to be cleared of sand so that we could get our feet on the pedals.  The armour (Centurians and FV 432's seemed to manage to stay free of sand inside).  My greatest fun was driving an International Half Track from a really sandy spot back to our base at a place called Timimi when most of my driving was undertaken standing up as the seat was too hard on thebackside with all the bouncing around over the hard desert.  When I took my cap and goggles off I looked like a Panda.  The cemetary at Accroma (Knightbridge Box) is a truly emotional spot.  It is tranquil and as you cross through the arched gateway I am sure the temperature drops a degree or two.  When I visited there was lush grass in small area that was tended by an elderly Arab.

 The three hour drive from Tobruk to TImimi was interesting too, with several WW2 trench lines and bunkers visible.  Some of these with cartoons drawn on the "walls" and other left overs.   Huge piles of banding wire were often seen as well as the British petrol containers that were used before Jerry cans.

Mines were still very evident and many exploded with dire consequences to camels and roving donkeys as well as some near misses with we soldiers who were inquisitive enough to fiddle once too  often.   I watched the disposal of a very small Anti-Personnel mine that had clearly been left on top of something much larger.  The resulting explosion was like a nuclear bomb going off with a  huge mushrom cloud of Libyan dust and sand that had us trying to outrun the stone laden downpour, unsucessfully!

 

Anyway, his story is still good if a bit romantic.

Nice observations thanks for this, as you say allow for some degree of authors romanticism.






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