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Christie tanks, Unknowns, various wheeled/armoured vehichles and weapons

T1931 Christie Light American USA

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grizly1973 #1 Posted 06 August 2015 - 04:09 PM

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Hello everyone. I'm here today to present you a completly forgotten Christie tank - The T1931.

 

So, let me tell you what the hell is this vehicle:

It was a light tank that was proposed in 1931 by Walter Christie, an american engineer that discovered a new spring-type suspension that could be used to both tracked and whelled vehicles. This vehicle was only a paper project that never reached the prototype stage because of the better M1931 version.

 

 

There was only one drawing ever made of this vehicle that was lost some weeks ago. Now, you may wonder from where do I know that... Well, let me explain the situation:

When my granddad was still alive, he was liking to collect all kinds of old documents and pictures. He was founding some of them in trash cans, some were bought by him at auction... You know... A few years ago, he showed me some of his collection when I spotted a strange tank blueprint. I asked him about it and he told me that it one of his friends gave him the drawing - both me, and he, had no idea on how did a blueprint from the United States reached Central Europe.

I didnt know anything about that blueprint, but I was not interested at that time either - I didnt do anything to try to save the last blueprint of a mysterious vehicle. So, a few weeks ago his house burned to ground because of an old kitchen stove that was losing gas. :( A few days ago I wanted to see that blueprints again, so I googled the name of the tank - T1931 Christie - and I have found nothing - at all - ever... Only then I realised the problem - the last blueprint is lost, forever. So I have tried to draw them back myself. All that I know is that the tank was using a 37mm. gun, it had 12 mm. of armor everywhere, it had a 5-drive whell chasis and that the superstructure was looking like an UFO with 4 turrets to choose from.

The turrets are:

-A simple M1931 Christie design turret from the M1931 tank that was produced (only 9 pieces were made - did not enter service);

-A very flattend cilindric turret;

-Another taller turret that I dont know how to describe (see the blueprints); :amazed:

-A turret that looks almost like the turrets of the soviet BT fast tanks;

 

So, thats all I know about the tank... Its low armored. It's looking awesome. It's quite a long vehicle. It had only 1 historical gun. It's known by no one except me... For now...

 

So... Now I'm gonna present you... A very, very special vehicle... Lost from archives and forgotten for almost a century... The ugliest best vehicle!!!

 

IMG_2172.JPGIMG_2173.JPGIMG_2174.JPGIMG_2175.JPGIMG_2176.JPGIMG_2177.JPGIMG_2178.JPGIMG_2179.JPGIMG_2180.JPGIMG_2171.JPG

-The turret drawn on the upper view of the tank is the BT-style one, not the "stock" one drawn in the side view;

 

(Just to be clear, the photos are not the original blueprint - because it was lost in a fire - It is made by me in order to show you how did this tank look - I remember his ugly face very good...);

 

So guys, thanks for reading my book extreamly long post!:justwait:

 

If anyone has good photoshop skills and wants to make a digital blueprint please e-mail me ( bubhyro@yahoo.com ). Thanks for support!


Edited by grizly1973, 08 August 2015 - 08:39 PM.


grizly1973 #2 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:33 PM

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m1919.gif

Produced in 1919 by THE FRONT DRIVE MOTOR COMPANY. Total production = 1.

  • CREW: 3
  • ARMAMENT: One 6pdr (57mm) gun in main turret and one cal. 30 MG in upper turret.
  • ARMOR: 0.25" to 1.0".
  • MAXIMUM SPEED: Probably 7 mph on tracks, 14 mph on wheels.
  • SUSPENSION: Rubber tired wheels, only center wheels sprung.
  • TRACKS: Removable, flat steel plates 15" wide, pitch 9.75".
  • GENERAL ARRANGEMENT: Driver in front; gunners in center; engine & final drive in rear.
  • DIMENSIONS: Length: 18' 2"; Width: 8' 6"; Height: 8' 9".
  • WEIGHT: 13.5 tons.
  • ENGINE: Christie, 6 cylinder, 120 HP, forced water cooling.
  • HORSEPOWER Per Ton: 8.9.
  • TRANSMISSION: Sliding gear, 4 speeds forward, 4 reverse.
  • FUEL RANGE: 35 miles on tracks, 75 miles on wheels.
  • FUEL CAPACITY: 59 gallons.
  • SPECIAL FEATURES: Tracks carried above the wheels when driving on wheels. Small pyramidal lugs on inside of plates for driving and guiding tracks. Center bogies raised when running on wheels. About 15 minutes to change from wheels to tracks or vice versa. The M1919 chassis was originally planned for use as either a truck or a tank. Haste in construction resulted in mechanical unreliability, inaccessibility of engine and transmission, and poorly designed tracks. Capable of equal speeds in forward and reverse.


grizly1973 #3 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:34 PM

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m1921.gif

Rebuilt from the 1919 tank in 1921 by THE FRONT DRIVE MOTOR COMPANY. Total production = 1.
  • CREW: 4
  • ARMAMENT: One 6pdr (57mm) gun in front and one cal. 30 MG on each side.
  • ARMOR: 0.25" to 0.75".
  • MAXIMUM SPEED: 7 mph on tracks, 14 mph on wheels.
  • SUSPENSION: Wheels with double rubber tires; front wheels sprung with coil springs, center wheels on pivoted bogies.
  • TRACKS: Removable, flat steel plates with grousers and driving lugs; 15" wide, pitch 9.75".
  • GENERAL ARRANGEMENT: Gunners in front; commander and driver in center (driver at left); engine & final drive in rear.
  • DIMENSIONS: Length: 18' 2"; Width: 8' 6"; Height: 7' 1".
  • WEIGHT: 14 tons.
  • ENGINE: Christie, 6 cylinder, 120 HP, forced water cooling. Mounted laterally.
  • HORSEPOWER Per Ton: 8.6.
  • TRANSMISSION: Sliding gear, 4 speeds forward, 4 reverse; a complete transmission on each side.
  • OBSTACLE ABILITY: Trench 7.5 feet; slope 40 degrees.
  • FUEL RANGE: 60 miles on tracks, 100 miles on wheels.
  • FUEL CAPACITY: 67 gallons.
  • SPECIAL FEATURES: Drive wheels unsprung; small crew compartment; poor maneuverability; underpowered.
 
The CHRISTIE M1921 by Robert J. Icks from the Sept/74 AFV News
WWI on the Western Front, except for the first few and last few weeks, consisted of trench warfare and its influence continued for many years afterward. Because of low track life, medium and heavy tanks had travelled as little as possible outside of combat, while light tanks were carried on trucks. The Westerveldt or Caliber Board, recommended the direction that future weapons development whould take, including a recommendation that only a medium tank be developed.
The US Tank Corps in 1919 urged negotiations with Walter J. Christie, whose self-propelled guns represented a different approach, designed to conserve track life. This was done, and the Christie M1919 tank resulted, but it had been hastily built and assembled. It had poor suspension and the engine and transmission were difficult to get at. Changeover from tracks to wheels required 15 minutes. The center wheels were raised when running on roads.
This tank was armed with a 6pdr(57mm) gun in the main turret and one MG in the cupola. It had 1/4" to 1" armor, steel tracks 15" wide, and 9-3/4" pitch. The road wheels were rubber tired and only the center wheels were sprung. After generally unsatisfactory performance, the tank was returned to Christie, who rebuilt it into the M1921. The appearance was changed by eliminating the turret and placing the 6pdr in the nose, and lowering the height to 7'1". Another MG was added and one was placed on either side of the main weapon. The suspension was similar, but the front wheels in this model were sprung with long recoil springs.
At first this tank performed so well that Army TO&E were rearranged on the premise that eventual rearmament with this type of tank would take place. However, manoeuverability was poor, the crew compartment was cramped, and more and more defects appeared. After testing by Ordnance, it was turned over to the Infantry, who dropped it in 1924.
Christie came back with a new vehicle with a more advanced suspension in 1928 and this evolved into the T3 Convertible. The later T4 finally was also dropped. Christie built 15 vehicles between 1916 and 1924 at a cost to the Ordnance Dept. of $739,240 plus $100,000 for all current and future suspension patent rights. When Congress began cutting funds to the military in 1921, there was little money for experimental designs.
Many of Christie's designs were ingenious, but they were mechanically unreliable. In addition there were other factors during this period. A surplus of tanks was left over from WWI, and the National Defense Act of 1920 assigned tanks to the infantry but the War Dept. made no policy statement on tanks until 1922. At that time they were classified as light, medium and heavy, to be few in number and possessed of slow speed so as to accompany infantry under conditions of trench warfare. Ordnance designed a Medium A tank in 1921 and rebuilt it into the M1922 the following year. It was turreted, armed as the Christie M1919 and was rugged and dependable, and had a longer track life. Interest swung to it and away from Christie.


grizly1973 #4 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:36 PM

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m1928.gif

Produced in 1928 by U.S. WHEEL TRACK LAYER CORPORATION. Total production = 1.

  • CREW: Undetermined
  • ARMAMENT: One 37mm gun and one cal. 30 MG in upper turret.
  • ARMOR: 0.5".
  • MAXIMUM SPEED: 42.5 mph on tracks, 70 mph on wheels.
  • SUSPENSION: "Christie Suspension" (individually suspended bogie wheels, each mounted on a coil sprung bell crank).
  • TRACKS: Forged steel plates with U-shaped driving lugs attached to each alterate plate, 10" wide, pitch 10".
  • GENERAL ARRANGEMENT: Crew compartment in front; driver in left rear part of crew compartment; engine & final drive in rear.
  • DIMENSIONS: Length: 17 ft.; Width: 7 ft.; Height: 6 ft.
  • WEIGHT: 8.6 tons.
  • ENGINE: Liberty, 12 cylinder, V-type, 338 HP, forced water cooling.
  • HORSEPOWER Per Ton: 39.3.
  • TRANSMISSION: Sliding gear, 4 speeds forward, 1 reverse. First equipped with 5 separate gear shift levers; later replaced with standard gear shift. OBSTACLE ABILITY: Trench 7 ft.; stream 5 ft.; slope 37 degrees; vertical wall 28 in.
  • FUEL RANGE: 75 miles on tracks, 115 miles on wheels.
  • FUEL CAPACITY: 35 gallons; 50 gallons on rebuild.
  • SPECIAL FEATURES: This was the forerunner of the 1931 tank and although lighter in weight was similar as a vehicle to the later tank in all essential features. The U.S. Army wished to buy the chassis but Christie refused to sell since he felt it could be improved upon. Rebuilt, tested and then sold for junk. The "Christie Suspension" developed for the M1928 was employed in the M1931 and all subsequent Christie tanks.
    Apart from the independent suspension, Christie also pioneered two other tank suspension features which were generally applicable: large diameter road wheels and rubber tires. Christie's introduction of both was rather fortuitous, for it was essentially a by-product of his aim to design tanks so that they could operate without tracks as well as with them.


grizly1973 #5 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:37 PM

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m1931.gif

Produced in 1931 by U.S. WHEEL TRACK LAYER CORPORATION Total production = 9.

  • CREW: 2
  • ARMAMENT: One 37mm) gun in main turret and cal. 30 MG in one mount (T-3 Medium); and one cal. 50 MG and cal. 30 MG in coaxial mounting (T-1 Combat Car).
  • ARMOR: 0.25" to 0.625", exclusive of 0.188 inner hull of nickel steel.
  • MAXIMUM SPEED: 40 mph on tracks, 70 mph on wheels.
  • SUSPENSION: "Christie Suspension". Four large weight-bearing wheels each side, each with dual runner tires; long vertically placed, adjustable coil springs. The liberal compression amplitude gave each wheel an independent maximum vertical movement of about 14 inches .
  • TRACKS: Forged steel plates, each alternate plate having a driving lug integral therewith; 10.25" wide, pitch 10". When on wheels the tracks were carried on shelves at the sides of the tank.
  • GENERAL ARRANGEMENT: Driver in front; gunner in center; engine & final drive in rear.
  • DIMENSIONS: Length: 17' 10"; Width: 7' 4"; Height: 7' 3". (The height varied slightly with adjustment of suspension springs.)
  • WEIGHT: 10.5 tons.
  • ENGINE: Liberty, 12 cylinder, V-type, 338 HP, forced water cooling.
  • HORSEPOWER Per Ton: 32.2.
  • TRANSMISSION: Sliding gear, 4 speeds forward, 1 reverse.
  • FUEL RANGE: 170 miles on tracks, 250 miles on wheels.
  • FUEL CAPACITY: 89 gallons.
  • SPECIAL FEATURES: Five tanks were originally ordered (chain driven) and later two more (gear driven) were acquired after the Polish government, which had contracted for them was turned down by Christie. Starting in September 1931, delivery of these vehicles (minus armor, armament, engine, guns, and radio) was made at a cost of $34,500 per tank. Armor, armament and engine were installed by the Ordnance Department. Two additional chassis of this type were purchased by Russia. Thirty minutes was required to change from tracks to wheels or vice versa.
  • COMMENT: There has always been a dispute over exactly which chassis eventually went to England for their Cruiser Tank development, and it appears as though it was a 1930 transitional version of the above. It also appears to be the same chassis that the Polish government tried unsuccessfully to buy, and after being impounded for six years by U.S. Customs during the dispute, it was finally released to the British and purchased by Lord Nuffield for their A13 project. The Poles meanwhile had adopted some of the ideas developed by Christie and started work on their own version, the 10TP cruiser tank.


grizly1973 #6 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:39 PM

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m1932.gif

Produced in 1932 by U.S. WHEEL TRACK LAYER CORPORATION Total production = 1.

  • CREW: 3
  • ARMAMENT: Could carry one cannon and one or more machine guns.
  • ARMOR: 0.375" to 0.5". (Thicker armor could be installed).
  • MAXIMUM SPEED: 60 mph on tracks, 120 mph on wheels.
  • SUSPENSION: Similar to 1931 model but with a maximum vertical movement of 24 inches; wheels of duraluminum with Firestone pneumatic tires. The two rear wheels had a slightly greater diameter than the front pairs.
  • TRACKS: Forged steel plates; 11" wide; 7" pitch; track pin 3/8" diameter.
  • GENERAL ARRANGEMENT: Cannon in front; crew in front center; engine & final drive in rear.
  • DIMENSIONS: Length: about 22 ft.; Width: about 7 ft; Height: about 5' 8".
  • WEIGHT: about 5 tons.
  • ENGINE: Hispano-Suize, 12 cylinder, V-type, 750 HP, forced water cooling.
  • HORSEPOWER Per Ton: 150.
  • TRANSMISSION: Sliding gear, 3 speeds forward, 1 reverse. It had a power take-off for the flying propeller. One modification provided for a transfer gear case to propel a helicopter roter above the vehicle for lift purposes.
  • OBSTACLE ABILITY: Could jump across a 20 foot trench from a 45 degree slope.
  • FUEL RANGE: unknown.
  • FUEL CAPACITY: 89 gallons.
  • SPECIAL FEATURES: Of very light construction throughout for airborne role. Chassis consisted of a double hull which enclosed the suspension springs. The inner hull was made of welded duraluminum plates, and the outer hull of welded steel plates. Rear ground wheels were driven through a knee-armed gear box when the tracks were off.
    m1932fly.gif
    Originally it had been proposed that the chassis be equipped with a disposable biplane and propeller assembly. Using this arrangement the vehicle would become airborne by taxiing along the ground on its tracks to gain momentum and then transferring power to the propeller. Later plans contemplated carrying the tank by a special aircraft and releasing it close to the ground. In this case dual air-speed indicators would enable the tanks driver, before being dropped, to accelerate his tracks to a speed equaling that of the aircraft. Adaptation of these concepts and designs in the form of permanently installed, high speed track-laying airplane undercarriages would permit the operation of large aircraft from unimproved fields. Erratic and undependable, the M1932 was modified twice and then sold to Russia, who had a keen interest in the flying tanks idea.


grizly1973 #7 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:41 PM

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m1935a.gif

Produced in 1935 (?). Total production = 1.

  • CREW: 2
  • ARMAMENT: Dummy gun only. Intended to house any gun up to 75mm.
  • ARMOR: 0.5".
  • MAXIMUM SPEED: 60 mph on tracks, 90 mph on wheels.
  • SUSPENSION: "Christie Suspension". Rubber tired wheels.
  • TRACKS: (?)
  • GENERAL ARRANGEMENT: Cannon in front; crew in center; engine & final drive in rear.
  • DIMENSIONS: Length: 15 ft.; Width: 6.5 ft.; Height: 5.5 ft.
  • WEIGHT: 4 tons.
  • ENGINE: 300 HP, supercharged to 450 HP.
  • HORSEPOWER Per Ton: (?)
  • TRANSMISSION: (?)
  • FUEL RANGE: (?)
  • FUEL CAPACITY: (?)
  • SPECIAL FEATURES: Airborne convertible wheel-track vehicle; reported to have been gas proof and water tight. Rebuilt Combat Car M1933(?).


grizly1973 #8 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:43 PM

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m1935b.gif

Produced in 1935 (?). Total production = 1.

  • CREW: 2 or 3
  • ARMAMENT: Dummy 75mm gun.
  • ARMOR: (?).
  • MAXIMUM SPEED: 65 mph on tracks, 95 mph on wheels.
  • SUSPENSION: "Christie Suspension". Rubber tired wheels.
  • TRACKS: (?)
  • GENERAL ARRANGEMENT: Cannon in front; crew in center; engine & final drive in rear.
  • DIMENSIONS: Length: about 21 ft.; Width: about 7 ft.; Height: about 5.5 ft.
  • WEIGHT: Probably 5.5 tons.
  • ENGINE: Believed to be Hispano-Suisa, 12 cylinder, 750 HP, forced water cooling.
  • HORSEPOWER Per Ton: (?)
  • TRANSMISSION: Selective.
  • FUEL RANGE: (?)
  • FUEL CAPACITY: (?)
  • SPECIAL FEATURES: Airborne convertible wheel-track vehicle. Twin cupolas toward the rear of chassis. Rebuilt M1935/A(?).


grizly1973 #9 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:44 PM

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m1936.gif

Produced in 1936 by THE CHRISTIE CHASSIS, Inc. Total production = 1.
CREW: 2
ARMAMENT: Dummy cannon.
ARMOR: (?)
MAXIMUM SPEED: (?)
SUSPENSION: "Christie Suspension". Coil springs housed in horizontally placed tubes.
TRACKS: High grade forged nickel steel having no bolted parts.
GENERAL ARRANGEMENT: Cannon in front; crew in center; engine & final drive in rear.
DIMENSIONS: Length: 17.5 ft.; Width: 6.5 ft.; Height: 5.5 ft.
WEIGHT: 6 tons.
ENGINE: Curtiss D-12, 300 HP.
HORSEPOWER Per Ton: (?)
TRANSMISSION: Christie synchro-mesh with aluminum case.
OBSTACLE ABILITY: Could jump 15 foot trench.
FUEL RANGE: (?)
FUEL CAPACITY: (?)
SPECIAL FEATURES: An airborne type vehicle capable of being released from moving aircraft. No provision to be driven with tracks removed. Its gear ratio permitted acceleration to 60mph in 100 feet.



grizly1973 #10 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:45 PM

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m1937.gif

Produced in 1937 by U.S. CONVERTIBLE SYSTEM, Inc. Total production = 1.

  • CREW: 2
  • ARMAMENT: None
  • ARMOR: Maximum 11/16 in.
  • MAXIMUM SPEED: (?)
  • SUSPENSION: "Christie Suspension". As on M1936. Maximum vertical movement of 16".
  • TRACKS: (?)
  • GENERAL ARRANGEMENT: Crew in center; engine & final drive in rear.
  • DIMENSIONS: Length: 17.5 ft.; Width: 6.5 ft.; Height: about 5 ft.
  • WEIGHT: 6 tons.
  • ENGINE: Curtiss Wright aviation engine, 430 HP.
  • HORSEPOWER Per Ton: (?)
  • TRANSMISSION: 3 speeds forward, 1 reverse.
  • FUEL RANGE: (?)
  • FUEL CAPACITY: (?)
  • SPECIAL FEATURES: Airborne type vehicle similar to M1936. Christie took this tank with him when he traveled to England in 1937 to assist Morris Company in designing the Cruiser Tank Mk.III. During a demonstration for Gen. Le Q. Martel at the Aldershot Proving Grounds a speed of 64 mph was achieved over moderately rough ground.


grizly1973 #11 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:47 PM

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m1938.gif

Produced in 1938 by U.S. CONVERTIBLE SYSTEM, Inc. Total production = 1.

  • CREW: 2
  • ARMAMENT: None
  • ARMOR: Maximum 5/8 in.
  • MAXIMUM SPEED: 80 mph.
  • SUSPENSION: Similar to M1936
  • TRACKS: Forged steel; weight of both tracks and connecting pins only 1600 lbs; pitch 5 in.
  • GENERAL ARRANGEMENT: Crew in center; engine & final drive in rear.
  • DIMENSIONS: Length: about 17.5 ft.; Width: 7.5 ft.; Height: about 5 ft.
  • WEIGHT: 4.5 tons.
  • ENGINE: Modified Curtiss Wright aviation engine, 450 HP, liquid cooled.
  • HORSEPOWER Per Ton: (?)
  • TRANSMISSION: 3 speeds forward, 1 reverse.
  • FUEL RANGE: (?)
  • FUEL CAPACITY: (?)
  • SPECIAL FEATURES: Airborne type vehicle similar to M1936-37 models. It may have been a rebuilt M1937. Extensive use of aluminum (e.g. transmission box, fuel tanks, etc.) and flexible tube hosing (e.g. fuel and oil feed lines, etc.) permitted operation at extremely high speeds over rough terrain. Improved brake and clutch system. Its high speed and low silhouette suited it for the role of tank destroyer.


grizly1973 #12 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:49 PM

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m1941.gif

Produced in 1937 by U.S. CONVERTIBLE SYSTEM, Inc. Total production = 1.

  • CREW: 2
  • ARMAMENT: None. 90mm recoilless rifle contemplated.
  • ARMOR: (?)
  • MAXIMUM SPEED: (?)
  • SUSPENSION: Similar to M1936.
  • TRACKS: (?)
  • GENERAL ARRANGEMENT: Crew in center; engine & final drive in rear.
  • DIMENSIONS: Length: about 18 ft.; Width: about 7 ft.; Height: about 5 ft.
  • WEIGHT: (?)
  • ENGINE: (?)
  • HORSEPOWER Per Ton: (?)
  • TRANSMISSION: (?)
  • FUEL RANGE: (?)
  • FUEL CAPACITY: (?)
  • SPECIAL FEATURES: Rebuilt T-12 (?). Airborne type to be employed as a high speed tank destroyer. Modified and used as a tracked truck for a number of years and then junked. Christie's AFVs, especially the later airborne models, have been criticised on the following grounds:
    • Calculations based upon the employment of simulated armor in the prototypes produced an overloaded vehicle, and components incapable of standing the additional strain when actual armor and armament were added.
    • Exclusive employment of dummy armament resulted in ignoring problems which would be raised when installing real guns.
    • High horsepower-to-weight ratios made for "flash performances" which could not be expected under conditions of actual combat.
    • A tendency to throw tracks on turns at high speeds and undue wear caused by too great a track pitch.
    • Inadequate fighting compartment.

Edited by grizly1973, 20 August 2015 - 01:11 PM.


grizly1973 #13 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:50 PM

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m1942.gif

Produced in 1942. Total production = 1.

  • CREW: Undetermined.
  • ARMAMENT: Dummy: six machine guns, one small calibre cannon.
  • ARMOR: (?)
  • MAXIMUM SPEED: (?)
  • SUSPENSION: Similar to M1936.
  • TRACKS: (?)
  • GENERAL ARRANGEMENT: Cannon and one MG in front, two MGs on either side; engine & final drive in rear.
  • DIMENSIONS: (?)
  • WEIGHT: (?)
  • ENGINE: (?)
  • HORSEPOWER Per Ton: (?)
  • TRANSMISSION: (?)
  • FUEL RANGE: (?)
  • FUEL CAPACITY: (?)
  • SPECIAL FEATURES: Mockup on M1941 chassis. A high-speed light tank with no means for release from moving aircraft..


grizly1973 #14 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:51 PM

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m1942.gif

Produced in 1942. Total production = 1.

  • CREW: Undetermined.
  • ARMAMENT: Dummy: six machine guns, one small calibre cannon.
  • ARMOR: (?)
  • MAXIMUM SPEED: (?)
  • SUSPENSION: Similar to M1936.
  • TRACKS: (?)
  • GENERAL ARRANGEMENT: Cannon and one MG in front, two MGs on either side; engine & final drive in rear.
  • DIMENSIONS: (?)
  • WEIGHT: (?)
  • ENGINE: (?)
  • HORSEPOWER Per Ton: (?)
  • TRANSMISSION: (?)
  • FUEL RANGE: (?)
  • FUEL CAPACITY: (?)
  • SPECIAL FEATURES: Mockup on M1941 chassis. A high-speed light tank with no means for release from moving aircraft..

Attached Thumbnails


Edited by grizly1973, 20 August 2015 - 12:51 PM.


grizly1973 #15 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:54 PM

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christie_acc_m1933_1m.jpgchristie_acc_m1933_2.jpgchristie_acc_m1933_3.jpgchristie_acc_m1933_4.jpg

Came in 2 variations as you see above. Very little is known about it...


Edited by grizly1973, 20 August 2015 - 12:54 PM.


grizly1973 #16 Posted 20 August 2015 - 12:57 PM

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Christie_SPGs_1_small.jpgChristie_SPGs_2_small.jpgChristie_SPGs_3_small.jpgChristie_SPGs_4_small.jpgChristie_SPGs_25_small.jpgChristie_SPGs_5_small.jpgChristie_SPGs_6_small.jpgChristie_SPGs_7_small.jpg

 

This vehicle was delivered to the Ordnance Dept for testing in 1918. The odd looking single large return wheel was part of an arrangement to adjust track tension in combination with the two roadwheels. The vehicle was designed to run on wheels or tracks with the central roadwheels jacked up so it ran on only the front and rear pairs of wheels. Only the centre roadwheels were sprung which must have made steering the vehicle on wheels very difficult. It was powered by a Christie built 6-cylinder 120 hp engine, the transmission type is unknown but a max. speed of 16 mph was attained. Testing showed that the vehicle had many faults and it was rejected. However, some of the design ideas were interesting and Christie was encouraged to continue development.



grizly1973 #17 Posted 20 August 2015 - 01:00 PM

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Christie_SPGs_26_small.jpgChristie_SPGs_27_small.jpgChristie_SPGs_28_small.jpgChristie_SPGs_29_small.jpgChristie_SPGs_31_small.jpgChristie_SPGs_30_small.jpg

 

It's not certain when this vehicle was built, best guess is 1918-19. The original identity of the vehicle was a mystery until a patent assigned to Walter Christie was found. The drawings in the patent are a match for the available images of the vehicle. The vehicle was four-wheel drive was powered by a 4-cylinder 60 hp engine with a 3 forward 1 reverse speed transmission giving a max. speed of 15 mph. No comments have been found on the suitability of the vehicle for its role as a mobile AA gun.



grizly1973 #18 Posted 20 August 2015 - 01:05 PM

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In 1919 Christie delivered a new SPG design for testing at APG (Aberdeen Proving Ground). The SPG was designed, as the 8inch gun carrier was, to run on wheels or tracks. The conversion from tracks to wheels took about 15 minutes and the tracks were strapped onto the mudguards when not in use. The rear driving wheels were rigid but the steering wheels were independently sprung. The centre two roadwheels were sprung and jacked off the ground when running on wheels. All of the wheels had a pair of 36" x 3" solid rubber tires - the drive wheels used the typical Christie sprocketless drive - the track guide plates entered slots in the drive wheel. The engine was the same as 8inch vehicle - the 120 hp Christie engine with a transmission which had 4 forward and 4 reverse speeds. The 155mm SPG could travel almost as fast in reverse (12mph) as forward (15mph) on wheels. The max. forward speed on tracks was about 9 mph, considerably faster than the early Holt SPGs. Testing showed that 155mm SPG was very promising and Christie built two further versions of the SPG delivered in 1920 and 1921. These vehicles looked very similar to the original except that mudguards were replaced with a shallow box structure with rollers at the ends presumably to make it easier to secure the tracks when the SPG was running on wheels. Final testing of the Christie 155mm SPG in 1921-22 was very successful and the Ordnance Department recommended placing the vehicle in production. However, due to the hostility of Field Artillery branch to SPGs and declining defence budgets this never happened.

There are many comments in the modern literature about the unreliability and poor performance of the Christie vehicles - this is clearly not so. In 1919 a report in the Field Artillery Journal notes that:
"In the run from Hoboken, NJ to Washington, DC, a distance of 276 miles, the running time was 51 hours 16 minutes and average speed of 534 mph."
"On a 100-mile maximum speed test, an average speed of 13.23 mph was maintained. A speed of 21 mph over a measured mile was attained"
"The mount has negotiated slopes exceeding 100% (i.e. 45°;), and very difficult terrain."

 



grizly1973 #19 Posted 20 August 2015 - 01:07 PM

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There is very little information on this SPG, two vehicles were tested at APG in 1920. It appears to be roughly equivalent to the Holt Mark VII. It was powered by a 90hp Christie engine and a 4 speed transmission which gave a top speed of 20mph on wheels. The vehicle weighed about 7,200 kg and was 3.65m long and 2.28m wide. The gun was the U.S. built version of the French 75mm Mle 1897.



grizly1973 #20 Posted 20 August 2015 - 01:08 PM

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Very few details about this vehicle are known. It was tested at APG in 1921. The suspension appears to be very similar to the Christie M1919 medium tank. The SPG was, as most Christie vehicles were, designed to run on wheels or tracks, the two small roadwheels could be jacked up out of ground contact. The weight of the vehicle was 8,170 kg.







Also tagged with T1931, Christie, Light, American, USA

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