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Buying a tank model kit, anyone with experience?


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markthekiller #1 Posted 19 August 2017 - 10:34 PM

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I am going to buy a Panther 1:35 scale model kit soon and I got a question because I'm a beginner and it's only my second model kit (finished my 1:76 Cromwell 5 days ago). 

So what I want to ask:

What is the best (and affordable)  way to paint the tank? I was thinking about using spray paint, but is there a better way?

I painted the Cromwell with a brush and paint that came with the package, but it doesn't really look realistic, probably because I used too much paint... 

 

 



Three_Rounds_Rapid #2 Posted 19 August 2017 - 11:30 PM

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Without even asking I know that's the Airfix Cromwell starter set you built. The acrylic paints in those sets are crap. Brush painting is perfectly viable with decent paints, acrylic model paints are quick drying and clean with water but are a bit more delicate, enamel model paints clean with white spirits (and therefore smell) and take longer to dry but are more hard wearing. When you buy the kit look at the colours you will need and buy a few model paint tinlets of those colours, they are quite cheap and will last a few kits. Brush painting takes a bit of practice, better a few thinner coats than one thick one. Humbrol, Tamiya and Vallejo are good model paint ranges who have colours to match most subjects without requiring mixing (unlike Revell paints). If you can get yourself a bottle of liquid cement glue, it is applied by brush or applicator and is much better than the gloopy tube glue.

FluffyRedFox #3 Posted 19 August 2017 - 11:36 PM

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I just use a paint and brush, I'm completely crap with an airbrush.

Best results I get is watering down the paint a bit so that it spreads well, and then using masking tape to paint different colours if need be. 

Oh, and if you haven't decided on a particular Panther kit, the Tamiya 1/35 is very good, fits together well, looks good and is cheap.



rsanders5 #4 Posted 20 August 2017 - 11:39 AM

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 I found that painting the whole model with the main paint colour, eg green for British

vehicles, field grey for German, adds to the realistic look. Once the base colour is

dry you add the contrasting colours.



markthekiller #5 Posted 20 August 2017 - 12:09 PM

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View Postrsanders5, on 20 August 2017 - 11:39 AM, said:

 I found that painting the whole model with the main paint colour, eg green for British

vehicles, field grey for German, adds to the realistic look. Once the base colour is

dry you add the contrasting colours.

 

I was thinking about painting it the same grey as in WoT since it looks pretty nice, and since I only have to buy 1 color it's the cheapest option aswell :coin:. But do you know what kind of grey that is?

And with the tracks, do I have to paint the tank (without the tracks) grey first and then put the tracks (which are already painted) on? Or is there a better/easier way?

 

View Postfishbob101, on 19 August 2017 - 11:36 PM, said:

I just use a paint and brush, I'm completely crap with an airbrush.

Best results I get is watering down the paint a bit so that it spreads well, and then using masking tape to paint different colours if need be. 

Oh, and if you haven't decided on a particular Panther kit, the Tamiya 1/35 is very good, fits together well, looks good and is cheap.

 

I painted the Cromwell with paint and brush aswell, but it doesn't look that good. I'm not sure if it was me or the quality of the paint.

 

View PostThree_Rounds_Rapid, on 19 August 2017 - 11:30 PM, said:

Without even asking I know that's the Airfix Cromwell starter set you built. The acrylic paints in those sets are crap. Brush painting is perfectly viable with decent paints, acrylic model paints are quick drying and clean with water but are a bit more delicate, enamel model paints clean with white spirits (and therefore smell) and take longer to dry but are more hard wearing. When you buy the kit look at the colours you will need and buy a few model paint tinlets of those colours, they are quite cheap and will last a few kits. Brush painting takes a bit of practice, better a few thinner coats than one thick one. Humbrol, Tamiya and Vallejo are good model paint ranges who have colours to match most subjects without requiring mixing (unlike Revell paints). If you can get yourself a bottle of liquid cement glue, it is applied by brush or applicator and is much better than the gloopy tube glue.

 

But if I want to paint the tank with the grey as in WoT (as I said above), isn't it better to just buy a spray can or however that's called in the modelworld? (not sure if that's actually a word).

I want the tank to look brandnew btw, so no rusting, mud etc.


Edited by markthekiller, 20 August 2017 - 12:11 PM.


250swb #6 Posted 20 August 2017 - 12:13 PM

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Lots of guides on YouTube, and for beginners Andy's Hobby Headquarters has some easy to follow examples

 

https://youtu.be/EjY_l8tbB1w?list=PLJ9qP_F2fj3zI2OihvqRt8SVHxo6328yc

 

He uses an air brush but with Tamiya spray paints in a rattle can you can do a good job.

 

 



Three_Rounds_Rapid #7 Posted 20 August 2017 - 12:37 PM

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You can use spray cans if you don't want the expense of investing in an airbrush, they do work out more expensive than regualr paints in the long run.

e.g https://www.hannants...roduct/HU067A15

Practice a bit first because it can be very easy to overdo the spray and build up too much paint so that it pools and runs.

 

For the tracks, if they are once piece "rubber band" tracks you can fit them after the tank is painted, if they are individual link and length tracks then you may have to fit them before, depending on the type of tank and if it has track guards. Also depends if you want a prisitine finish or a dirty covered in mud weathered look - in which case you assemble everything, paint it and then throw the equivalent of mud all over it using weathering pigments etc.



markthekiller #8 Posted 20 August 2017 - 05:24 PM

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View PostThree_Rounds_Rapid, on 20 August 2017 - 12:37 PM, said:

You can use spray cans if you don't want the expense of investing in an airbrush, they do work out more expensive than regualr paints in the long run.

e.g https://www.hannants...roduct/HU067A15

Practice a bit first because it can be very easy to overdo the spray and build up too much paint so that it pools and runs.

 

For the tracks, if they are once piece "rubber band" tracks you can fit them after the tank is painted, if they are individual link and length tracks then you may have to fit them before, depending on the type of tank and if it has track guards. Also depends if you want a prisitine finish or a dirty covered in mud weathered look - in which case you assemble everything, paint it and then throw the equivalent of mud all over it using weathering pigments etc.

 

If I was sure I'm going to build more models than I would buy an airbrush. But that isn't the case so I'll use spray cans (for now atleast). 

About the tracks, they are made out of 2 parts which you have to glue together into 1 complete track. I want them to look new as I said earlier, but maybe I'll change my mind and make the whole tank look like it was used in battle.

 

What I noticed when I typed "Panther tank" in Google that some of them are a bit yellowish, Is this how some Panthers looked like without camouflage? Or was that a kind of camouflage as well?



Nishi_Kinuyo #9 Posted 20 August 2017 - 08:22 PM

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Eh, I think most panthers were painted in the typical late war german "Dunkelgelb" base colour instead of the  early war german "feldgrau" (¿dunkelgrau?).

The switch to Dunkelgelb was made in february 1943; very shortly after the panther started production.

And half a year after that they started applying zimmerit.

Camouflage would be applied ontop of that according to locale and availability of paints.

 

As for brands: Tamiya and Fine Molds are probably two of the best; although the latter makes very few non-japanese tank kits, while Tamiya is the one where the 1/35 scale originated from; with a Panther model.

Also, a good hobby store selling model kits should allow you to visually inspect the kit before purchase (ask beforehand if you're uncertain); a fair idea if you're not sure with what sort of tracks the model comes with (or you could check gogol images).

 

My own Type 5 Chi-Ri model, for example, comes with individual track links; two pieces per track link at it.

Some of my other kits come with solid plastic strips of multiple track links.

While others come with the rubber band tracks.

 

Out of those; the rubber band is probably the most beginner-friendly.

 

For painting I'd say it is really up to individual preferences; personally I use rotmarder brushes and paint everything by hand, and since I've done a fair share of Warhammer models, I feel fairly confident about the results. I simply don't feel that confidence about using an airbrush (regardless of money involved).

 

Which reminds me; I really should unpack my models kits and get back to work on them.

Shameless self-promotion

Hope you'll feel confident about keeping us up to date on your panther. :girl:


Edited by Nishi_Kinuyo, 20 August 2017 - 08:36 PM.


markthekiller #10 Posted 20 August 2017 - 08:58 PM

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Thank you for your helpfull comment. Painting it with a brush is not a problem, but the result I got with my Cromwell was not great. Perhaps because I only painted it and nothing else (no protecting coats or anything else). What I also noticed with the paint I used is that after I painted a part, the paint "shrinks" which was really annoying because I had to use quite a lot of paint to fix that. Is this because of the quality of the paint or did I forgot to do something before I painted the camouflage? 

 

Just noticed how many times I have to use the word paint(ed)... 



Nishi_Kinuyo #11 Posted 20 August 2017 - 10:00 PM

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Paint "shrinking" as it dries would be related to surface tension, I think it was.

For acrylic paints at least, there's specially marketed "flow retarders" for that, or "flow improvers".

 

Some people claim that a tiny drop of dish washing soap can also help with it, others claim that a drop of floor wax helps; don't have experience with that myself though.

 

As for protecting a finished model; a (spray) coat of matte varnish should go a long way; although is only of importance if the models get handled with some frequency.

Satin varnish could also be used but might make it a bit more shiny.

And a small jar of glosse varnish could be used for optics or other shiny surfaces; but I wouldn't suggest using it for the entire model.



Three_Rounds_Rapid #12 Posted 20 August 2017 - 10:54 PM

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Paint shrinking can be caused by the release agent used on the plastic sprues during the injection molding process "repelling" it. Washing the sprues in lukewarm soapy water, rinsing and drying before making the kit will fix this. Using a primer before applying the actual paint helps give a good key to the surface that the paint will adhere too, this is more inmportant for acrylic water based paints.

 

The quality of paints in Airfix starter kits is nothing like a good quality model paint, you should find the ones you buy much easier to use and will give a better finish.

 

German camouflage was very varied, according to theatre and tank, but all used a basic number of paint colours applied over a red oxide primer. Very generally at the start of the war this was tank grey, then was switched to overall dark yellow, later dark yellow with patterns in red-brown and olive green.

 

http://www.panzerwor...rmor-camouflage



markthekiller #13 Posted 21 August 2017 - 10:57 AM

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Just found this Tamiya Panther:

https://www.modelbou...te-version.html

 

~€60 for the kit + paint and tools sounds decent right? 

 

Just found out that the tracks (of the model kit I was going to buy first, so not the Tamiya) are made out of rubber, but glueing (is that how you spell it?) rubber with plastic doesn't really work well, does it?


Edited by markthekiller, 21 August 2017 - 04:03 PM.


250swb #14 Posted 21 August 2017 - 04:53 PM

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View Postmarkthekiller, on 21 August 2017 - 10:57 AM, said:

Just found this Tamiya Panther:

https://www.modelbou...te-version.html

 

~€60 for the kit + paint and tools sounds decent right?

 

Just found out that the tracks (of the model kit I was going to buy first, so not the Tamiya) are made out of rubber, but glueing (is that how you spell it?) rubber with plastic doesn't really work well, does it?

 

 

That is the same kit I linked a build video to in my previous post. I honestly think you will need some spray cans of the basic acrylic colours, it is the only way to get a smooth brush stroke free finish. You can then use diluted oil paints for weathering and mud, but there are a million techniques for advanced work. If you want to save money on Tamiya primer paint use auto spray cans (available from Halfords if you are in the UK), matt black, matt white, matt grey, and matt red ( a rusty red shade that's a close colour match to actual German primer).



Nishi_Kinuyo #15 Posted 21 August 2017 - 05:23 PM

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Seems to be a pretty decent kit:

Youtube review

 

As for the tracks, your best bet is probably a bottle of superglue; hobby stores should carry some.

Think the Revell Contacta Spccial should work for it.



markthekiller #16 Posted 21 August 2017 - 06:01 PM

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View Post250swb, on 21 August 2017 - 04:53 PM, said:

 

 

That is the same kit I linked a build video to in my previous post. I honestly think you will need some spray cans of the basic acrylic colours, it is the only way to get a smooth brush stroke free finish. You can then use diluted oil paints for weathering and mud, but there are a million techniques for advanced work. If you want to save money on Tamiya primer paint use auto spray cans (available from Halfords if you are in the UK), matt black, matt white, matt grey, and matt red ( a rusty red shade that's a close colour match to actual German primer).

 

I think using a spray can is indeed the best option. I've been watching a couple of Andy's videos and they are very helpfull :medal:. He also made a video where he explains how to paint different kinds of tracks (plastic, rubber etc,), so I will use the same colors/washes as he does to make sure it will look good.

 

View PostNishi_Kinuyo, on 21 August 2017 - 05:23 PM, said:

Seems to be a pretty decent kit:

Youtube review

 

As for the tracks, your best bet is probably a bottle of superglue; hobby stores should carry some.

Think the Revell Contacta Spccial should work for it.

 

Thanks for that, I will buy one together with the other stuff


Edited by markthekiller, 21 August 2017 - 06:01 PM.


Three_Rounds_Rapid #17 Posted 21 August 2017 - 06:31 PM

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Tamiya Panther kits go together very well. You can join the rubber band tracks by using a small stapler, just hide the join under the track covers, this is much stronger than glues which don't always adhere well to the rubber tracks.

 

Instructions here to get a head start on planning;

https://www.super-ho...her-G-late.html

 

 



Ferditude #18 Posted 28 August 2017 - 02:18 AM

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https://www.scalemates.com/topics/topic.php?id=3938

ridiculously good website on everything made for panther models


 digital mag for panther painting, in this issue

https://pocketmags.com/scale-military-modeller-internat-magazine/smmi-vol-45-iss-534-september-2015

 

this must be a premium black panther, resting in hull down position. lol

 

 


Edited by Ferditude, 28 August 2017 - 02:23 AM.


Hardass #19 Posted 29 August 2017 - 10:39 AM

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Bought this for 15 Pound from a model shop you can get more expensive models but this is a good start kit from Tamiya 1/35th scale

 

Its the Panther Ausf A

 

Panther Asuf A



Ferditude #20 Posted 30 August 2017 - 08:07 PM

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Looks like a nice model!!!




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