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Dead_in_30_seconds #1 Posted 17 December 2017 - 04:58 PM

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Hi all.

I am not a good player, let's make that clear from the start, and I expect a huge amount of flak from so-called 'experts', but if this in any way helps anyone, I'm happy.

When we first start playing this game, it's almost impossible to stop ourselves from charging forward, guns blazing, only to discover that we are a smoking wreck within the first few minutes.

 

The reason? It's because we don't understand that this game, and always remember it is a game, actually requires practice, strategy, and an understanding that we light tankers have a very specific role to play.

 

It is our job to light up the enemy so that our bigger, heavier brethren can pound the s**t out of them. You may not feel that this caters for your desire to wreak Armageddon on the enemy that confirms our own self image that we are the biggest, baddest on the field, but we have to be realistic. Our guns are rubbish, our armour is paper thin and there's something a bit 'boring' about sitting in a bush!

 

So how do we avoid instant death, how do we avoid insults in 12 different languages, and how do we actually start to positively contribute to our team?

 

My thoughts are these.

Within the first 60 seconds of the game, we already know where the enemy is. They are in, or very close to, that big red circle. Our team doesn't need you to drive at 100mph, straight up the middle of the map to tell them where they are, they already know.

In the same vein, sitting in your own cap circle also doesn't help. You can try and pretend that you are 'defending the base', but the enemy tanks are miles away, and you are not in a tank that can realistically hold off an attack by the enemy later in the game.

So how do you actually make a difference? Pick a point about 3 or 4 lines up the map, find a bush or building to hide behind, and WAIT.

 

Now, look at the mini-map. Where have the rest of your team gone? Are there obvious gaps? Are there any TD's mediums or heavies that DON't have light tanks with them? Have the rest of your team-mates decided that they all need to drive up the same side of the map thereby leaving us wide open to a flanking maneuver?

This is probably the most important part of your game.

 

Your job is to support your team-mates. If you see a couple of heavies without a spotter, go join them. Move up the map SLOWLY, allowing them time to slowly push forward. Stay a couple of squares in front of them, and when you light up an enemy, FALL BACK and let them do their job. DO NOT try and peek round the corner to take 0.0005 HP off the enemy tank. All you will do is get in the way of your team-mates shot, get blown to smithereens and cause the enemy player to laugh so hard that snot will come out of his/hers nose.

When/if they do their job, resume your position slightly in front of them, rinse and repeat.You will get spotting damage, increase the chance of a win, and, if you're lucky, gain a tiny bit of respect for your efforts.

 

Don't be afraid to relocate if it's all gone belly up. Taking on 2 KV1's all by yourself might make you feel like a hero, but no-one's going to host a fund-raiser to celebrate you're heroism.

 

Later on in the game, you might start to see some enemy tanks that are low on health. Some LT's have a gun that can penetrate, but don't get obsessed with the kill. THINK! Reducing his hit points so I NEARLY killed him  before dying, is not as effective as reducing his hit points, backing off to allow a team-mate to finish him off and  BOTH surviving.

 

Finally.

Learn the game. Learn how spotting and camo works, learn the maps and from the mistakes you made last time, learn about angling your armour, use (and practice) the knowledge contained in the plethora of forums, always play as part of a team, even if no-one else seems to want to, and take heart in the fact that around 80% of ALL players have a victory rate of 50-60% and a survival rate of 30-40%.

 

It's a tough game to master. Don't give up, and don't uninstall it just because half of central Europe say's you should.

 

Happy tanking.

 



Xandania #2 Posted 17 December 2017 - 05:16 PM

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Well written. When I started the only advice for light tanking I got was sort of like this:

 

 

 



Bordhaw #3 Posted 17 December 2017 - 11:21 PM

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View PostDead_in_30_seconds, on 17 December 2017 - 03:58 PM, said:

Hi all.

I am not a good player, let's make that clear from the start, and I expect a huge amount of flak from so-called 'experts', but if this in any way helps anyone, I'm happy.

When we first start playing this game, it's almost impossible to stop ourselves from charging forward, guns blazing, only to discover that we are a smoking wreck within the first few minutes.

 

The reason? It's because we don't understand that this game, and always remember it is a game, actually requires practice, strategy, and an understanding that we light tankers have a very specific role to play.

 

It is our job to light up the enemy so that our bigger, heavier brethren can pound the s**t out of them. You may not feel that this caters for your desire to wreak Armageddon on the enemy that confirms our own self image that we are the biggest, baddest on the field, but we have to be realistic. Our guns are rubbish, our armour is paper thin and there's something a bit 'boring' about sitting in a bush!

 

So how do we avoid instant death, how do we avoid insults in 12 different languages, and how do we actually start to positively contribute to our team?

 

My thoughts are these.

Within the first 60 seconds of the game, we already know where the enemy is. They are in, or very close to, that big red circle. Our team doesn't need you to drive at 100mph, straight up the middle of the map to tell them where they are, they already know.

In the same vein, sitting in your own cap circle also doesn't help. You can try and pretend that you are 'defending the base', but the enemy tanks are miles away, and you are not in a tank that can realistically hold off an attack by the enemy later in the game.

So how do you actually make a difference? Pick a point about 3 or 4 lines up the map, find a bush or building to hide behind, and WAIT.

 

Now, look at the mini-map. Where have the rest of your team gone? Are there obvious gaps? Are there any TD's mediums or heavies that DON't have light tanks with them? Have the rest of your team-mates decided that they all need to drive up the same side of the map thereby leaving us wide open to a flanking maneuver?

This is probably the most important part of your game.

 

Your job is to support your team-mates. If you see a couple of heavies without a spotter, go join them. Move up the map SLOWLY, allowing them time to slowly push forward. Stay a couple of squares in front of them, and when you light up an enemy, FALL BACK and let them do their job. DO NOT try and peek round the corner to take 0.0005 HP off the enemy tank. All you will do is get in the way of your team-mates shot, get blown to smithereens and cause the enemy player to laugh so hard that snot will come out of his/hers nose.

When/if they do their job, resume your position slightly in front of them, rinse and repeat.You will get spotting damage, increase the chance of a win, and, if you're lucky, gain a tiny bit of respect for your efforts.

 

Don't be afraid to relocate if it's all gone belly up. Taking on 2 KV1's all by yourself might make you feel like a hero, but no-one's going to host a fund-raiser to celebrate you're heroism.

 

Later on in the game, you might start to see some enemy tanks that are low on health. Some LT's have a gun that can penetrate, but don't get obsessed with the kill. THINK! Reducing his hit points so I NEARLY killed him  before dying, is not as effective as reducing his hit points, backing off to allow a team-mate to finish him off and  BOTH surviving.

 

Finally.

Learn the game. Learn how spotting and camo works, learn the maps and from the mistakes you made last time, learn about angling your armour, use (and practice) the knowledge contained in the plethora of forums, always play as part of a team, even if no-one else seems to want to, and take heart in the fact that around 80% of ALL players have a victory rate of 50-60% and a survival rate of 30-40%.

 

It's a tough game to master. Don't give up, and don't uninstall it just because half of central Europe say's you should.

 

Happy tanking.

 

 

Also depends what tier, what map, what team and what tank. The role of "light" tanks has changed very much. Whilst you make valid points you describe the game from a year ago. 

Dead_in_30_seconds #4 Posted 18 December 2017 - 12:55 AM

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Hi Bordhaw, many thanks for your comments.

 

You are correct of course there are many points to consider, but in this initial post I was more concerned with laying down some simple, easy to follow principles.

 

Elements such as vehicle, tier and map nuances are something I hope to cover in subsequent posts. I didn't want to overload the casual player early on as I often find that too much information is almost as bad as not enough.

 

I do appreciate you taking the time to respond, and I would value your thoughts on my upcoming posts.



thestaggy #5 Posted 18 December 2017 - 01:31 PM

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As you progress, I would advise against scouting ahead of your heavies, especially if they are heading in to cities or corridors.

 

The very last thing a heavy tanker wants is to deal with a scout that is probing around in front of him. A skill heavy tankers (hopefully) learn is to sidescrape. Sidescraping = angling your tank in order to increase its effective armour. A sidescraping heavy will want to be on a corner and he won't want anyone right behind him or in front of him. Give him space.

 

And as you pointed out, the best thing to do is never be a hero. If 13 of your allies are going to one side of the map then just go with them. It is pointless trying to cover the open side of the map by yourself. You can either defend the rearguard of the train of allies or you can take up a position in the vanguard and help keep the train moving.



Bordhaw #6 Posted 18 December 2017 - 09:00 PM

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I think the biggest thing that helped me was learning the maps and where the different tank classes are more effective. 

cellaman7 #7 Posted 18 December 2017 - 09:45 PM

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Unless this is a second account then 585 games is barely scratching the surface of the game.

You need to learn the maps like the back of your hand, so to speak. Depending on the map you need to know during the countdown exactly where you are going to head for.

 

Use your speed to get a head start but park up somewhere safe or behind cover until you can study the minimap and see what your team are doing. There are places on most maps for the best spotting location such as the lighthouse on Cliff or half-courting on Prokhorovka/Fiery Salient. 

 

There are LOTS of guides on YouTube about using light tanks effectively.



Dead_in_30_seconds #8 Posted 18 December 2017 - 09:57 PM

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View Postthestaggy, on 18 December 2017 - 12:31 PM, said:

As you progress, I would advise against scouting ahead of your heavies, especially if they are heading in to cities or corridors.

 

The very last thing a heavy tanker wants is to deal with a scout that is probing around in front of him. A skill heavy tankers (hopefully) learn is to sidescrape. Sidescraping = angling your tank in order to increase its effective armour. A sidescraping heavy will want to be on a corner and he won't want anyone right behind him or in front of him. Give him space.

 

And as you pointed out, the best thing to do is never be a hero. If 13 of your allies are going to one side of the map then just go with them. It is pointless trying to cover the open side of the map by yourself. You can either defend the rearguard of the train of allies or you can take up a position in the vanguard and help keep the train moving.

 

Couldn't agree more Sir.

 

As far as spotting for heavies goes, I was hoping that this bit,

 

'Your job is to support your team-mates. If you see a couple of heavies without a spotter, go join them. Move up the map SLOWLY, allowing them time to slowly push forward. Stay a couple of squares in front of them, and when you light up an enemy, FALL BACK and let them do their job. DO NOT try and peek round the corner to take 0.0005 HP off the enemy tank. All you will do is get in the way of your team-mates shot, get blown to smithereens and cause the enemy player to laugh so hard that snot will come out of his/hers nose'

 

would make the point, but given the frustration levels a pushy scout can cause, perhaps I should have elaborated the point.

 

Thanks for your thoughts, I appreciate it.

 

 

So, time for post #2 in the series.

 

Firstly, massive thanks to those people who took the time to post their thoughts. I really appreciate your comments and the fact that you took the time to respond.

 

Cellaman7 made a good point, one that i should have picked up on, but didn't. He/she (no apologies for not making foolish assumptions) is quite correct when they say that 580ish battles is barely scratching the surface. This very clearly illustrates a fact that we should all take notice of. 

Unlike almost any other game that I can think of, 500+ battles is too few to even begin to get to grips with this game, and that is a point worth stressing. The learning curve of this game is quite steep and also requires a fairly large amount of time and commitment. If you truly want to become a player who isn't a liability, be willing and prepared to invest time and effort. It's the only way, there is no shortcut.

 

The last point I want to make today is to clarify a couple of terms. You will hear 2 terms during your early forays, one is noob and the other is newbie.

 

Generally speaking, a noob is someone who may, or may not, be new to the game, but for some reason is unable, or plain refuses, to learn the basics. These are the guys who make the same mistakes over and over and over again. Will often suicide rush into impossible situations, have no regard for their team-mates, block shots, shoot YOU in the arse for no reason, constantly call the rest of his (or her, musn't stereotype) team-mates losers, and generally spoil an otherwise enjoyable game. 

Make it your life's work not to be a noob.

 

The other is newbie. Now this one, on the surface, is not that much different. Yes we are new to the game; Yes we sometimes blunder into suicidal positions; Yes we sometimes, accidentally, hit our team-mates, and yes, we sometimes forget that we may be blocking a more powerful ally.

BUT

We know we make mistakes, we know we have a lot to learn, the difference is, we are practicing like mad to get better.

Most other player will forgive a newbie, some, too few if I'm honest, will actually offer words of advice, but in the name of all that is pure and decent, please, please, please, never succumb to the hellish world of NOOB.

 

Finally.

 

This is a link to a replay that is the first in a series that I hope will give some insight into how to make your very, very early games more enjoyable.

It rather clumsily gives examples of spotting. An example of a newbie angling armour, and shows a fairly decent position on this map, at least for the early part of the game.

 

http://wotreplays.eu/site/4014656?secret=93c8b0e32b4f25add778b822caa008b4

 

It will have scorn poured on it by 20,000 people who are significantly better at it than I am, but honestly, I'm not really posting it for their benefit.

 

Enjoy, and Happy tanking.

 

   


 

HeidenSieker #9 Posted 20 December 2017 - 12:19 AM

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I am happy to see that you have also mastered the art of not peeping out before you are ready to fire! :)

Dead_in_30_seconds #10 Posted 20 December 2017 - 09:50 PM

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Greetings fellow tankers.

 

So, looking at the replay above, what can we learn? Well, the position at H1 is pretty good for fast tanks that can set up quickly.

From here, you can cover tanks that are setting up near the lighthouse, and your position negates fire from the hill.

 

It's important that you play this position correctly.

HeidenSieker makes an excellent point when he/she mentions waiting until you're ready to fire before peeking. This sounds a simple subject, but it's a common. new player mistake. You'll notice that the Tank Destroyer that turns up seems to be firing fairly inaccurately. Wait until you see the shot, peek out in the 3-5 seconds it'll take them to reload, and take another few hit-points off them.

DO NOT do what a lot of players do, and sit there with him in your sights, silently praying that you reload quicker than they do and that they will die before you do. PEEK, FIRE, RETREAT. A hero that's dead will always remain one thing. DEAD.

 

If you're at H1, and nothing has appeared for a few minutes, you have a choice to make. Do you push up to the lighthouse, or do you relocate elsewhere? The decision is largely dictated by what's happening on the mini-map.

 

If you decide to push up the West flank, my advice is, BE CAREFUL. Not only are you susceptible to fire from the hill, but Tank Destroyers camped on A4 will more often than not see you long before you see them, resulting in that, oh so frustrating, death by invisible enemy.

 

If you choose to join your team-mates up the centre, or Eastern flank, watch yourself as you cross the 2,3,& 4 lanes as you are quite exposed.

 

Next replay will show you the joys of the Eastern flank, its' good positions, and it's potential pitfalls.

 

Until then, Happy tanking!

 

Good afternoon comrades.

 

Christmas greetings to all; May Santa Claus bring you all you wish for, including impenetrable armour, preferential matchmaking and shells that never miss.

 

Some more thoughts for us new players.

 

I made the decision very early on that I would not play any tank above tier IV until I was confident that I had begun to grasp the basics. I'd be interested to know what others think of this choice.

 

My rationale was this; Tier I & II will spend their time on either Mittengard or Mines, both of which are available on Proving Ground battle type. Proving Ground gives an excellent opportunity to learn the basics of tank driving. I still find it quite funny to watch players who don't take the time to learn, doing a strange sort of maneuver where they shuffle backwards and forwards seemingly oblivious to how their tank moves, and having an unhealthy attraction to a lump of rock!

One word of warning about Proving Ground. Don't believe that your results have any reflection on 'real' life. Proving Ground will see you destroying loads of tanks, winning 99.9% of battles and barely getting scratched. This is not to be taken seriously. The A in AI on proving ground actually stands for Absent; Not officially true, but incredibly accurate.

 

The other reason for my choice was that tier IV will quite often see you pitted against tier VI. This is more than enough challenge for anyone with less than 2000+ battles under their belt.

To date, I have still never driven tier V or above, Am I tempted? Of course, but I would rather be considered an asset to my team than derided for my lack of experience in higher tier battles. A view that I guess would be appreciated by more experienced players who don't want their gaming experience ruined by an idiot like me.

 

Spending your hard earned cash is my next topic.Again I can only give my opinion. and I more than welcome the thoughts of others, but my recommendation is that you DO consider some outlay.

 

Currently, you can buy the 'Essential Resources' package for £25.66, normally £27.23. This will give you 2550 gold and 2,500,000 credits. With this you can ensure that you never enter a battle with crew with less than 100% experience, and trust me it makes a huge difference, and you can buy some essentials like camo net and binoculars. When compared to how much other PC games cost, is this an unreasonable amount?

To reinforce, you could 'buy' your way up the tiers, but please don't.

 

I hope any of the content of my posts has been of use, and let's face it I'm hardly in a position to advise, but I know that this game can get frustrating.

In the meantime, I wish everyone peace, prosperity and happiness for 2018.

 

'til next time, happy tanking.

 

 

 


 

Tramp_In_Armour #11 Posted 24 December 2017 - 12:06 AM

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View PostDead_in_30_seconds, on 23 December 2017 - 10:03 PM, said:

I made the decision very early on that I would not play any tank above tier IV until I was confident that I had begun to grasp the basics. I'd be interested to know what others think of this choice.

 

This is good advice. I've tried to do this myself. I did buy a tier 6 premium (Cromwell B) but I'm terrible with it. I meet tier 8s who are far more experienced than I am. Currently I'm trying to master tier 5 and that's a challenge enough. Every time you go up a new tier, you meet new tanks that you have to learn to fight against, and this takes time. Plus I'm still learning the nuances of all the maps, and this is taking longer than I thought, especially since knowing how to fight a particular map in a light tank won't help much when you are in a medium, heavy or TD, so you end up having to think of the map in a different way. But there's no need to rush. There's so much to learn - so many tanks and their different styles - that it pays to take your time. And getting better at your particular tier makes the game more enjoyable.

 

The other truly important thing is that, as well as having 100% crews, improving their skills makes a huge difference. Having Sixth Sense and a second skill in progress make my crews way more effective, and this takes time too. Full camo or repairs, for instance, completely changes how your tank performs.


Edited by Tramp_In_Armour, 24 December 2017 - 12:09 AM.


Dead_in_30_seconds #12 Posted 24 December 2017 - 02:32 AM

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Hi Tramp, many thanks for taking the time to post.

 

Skills are a subject I will cover in a later post. I made a last minute decision to postpone mentioning them  as I began to form the opinion that a crew trained to 100% with skills in progress was almost worthless if we've not mastered using cover, identifying open lanes that expose us to long range TD's and generally driving around annoying heavies until they blow us up :)

 

Quite often I found myself staring at a smouldering tank that contained a skilled, dead crew rather than a smouldering tank that contained an untrained, dead crew. The common factor was, they were dead.

 

100% crew, with you all the way on that one. Repairs, camo etc? Jury's out on that one for now.

 

Anyway, thanks again for the post, and have a great Christmas.

 

Afternoon all.

 

2nd replay time. I mentioned that I would post a replay showing the Eastern flank of Mines, it's plusses and minuses, so here it is.

 

http://wotreplays.eu/site/4028251?secret=93c8b0e32b4f25add778b822caa008b4

 

F8 is my preferred 1st stop. As cellaman7 rightly pointed out, knowing where you're heading when the countdown reaches zero is a great help.

Once you reach F8, WAIT. Look at your mini-map. Quite often, as in this case, you'll see a team-mate heading in your direction. The Medium III trundling towards you is a good sign, it means that we aren't leaving the eastern flank exposed. Sometimes the Mediums will park up just behind you, this is an unspoken request for you to spot for him.

 

In this battle it seems that the Med III in question is on some kind of adrenaline rush. Your next decision is either to head Northwest and hug the base of the hill, or to head North into the village. The Med III makes this choice for you as he is merrily yolo'ing (You Only Live Once) his way around the hill.

So, we head cautiously North, wary of any fast enemy lights that may have approached said village. Nothing spotted, so we swing West, hopping from one cover to another and always being wary of the inevitable 'campers' on the ridge at A4.

Cover, pause, cover, pause,cover, pause your way forward.

 

A message pops up that simply says "SCOUT". A quick look at the map shows that the remaining enemy is unspotted. The request has come from your artillery (arty) so we push to the base of the ridge at A4 to see if we can get some proximity spots. Lo and behold, a Medium and a Tank Destroyer. Your arty buddies then make short work of turning them into piles of junk.

 

From here, you could head for the cap circle. When you have numerical superiority, and as you are full of the Christmas spirit, best to let someone else make the final kill to win the match.

 

One additional point. You may have noticed that I was carrying a load-out of APCR ammo. This extra penetration can sometimes be the difference between survival or death. if you've taken my earlier advice around buying the Essential Resources, this ammo can be purchased using credits rather than gold, and you should have enough to make it a sensible decision.

 

Hope you found this in some way useful.

 

Until next time, happy Christmas, happy New year, and happy tanking.   


 

Thuis001 #13 Posted 24 December 2017 - 05:20 PM

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View PostDead_in_30_seconds, on 19 December 2017 - 11:08 PM, said:

...

Indeed, there is a large difference between a n00b and a newby.

The first one is a player that has 10k or so games played and still hasn't learned the basics. These players are a pain in the *ss because they also play higher tiers, where them being horrible makes much more of a difference. These players generally have no hopes of being good, like EVER. They will get a lot of flak from the "better" players mainly because well, they suck and they have been doing so forever.

 

Newby on the other hand are just new players like you. They have essentially this choice: Do I spend time on this game, learn how it works and use the mechanics to my advantage, or not doing this and ending in the group of so called noobs. Newbies will mainly be tolerated, I mean well, everyone sucked the first couple of thousand games. ( I did, and still do sometimes, you probably aren't the best player around and even guys like Quickybaby and Jingles sucked when they first played WoT) The only reason newbies will get flak is mainly: A. They bought a tier VIII prem and derp around there with no clue of what to do. (This is probably the first tip I can give a player: DO NOT, FOR ANY REASON buy a tier VIII prem before you have a good understanding of the mechanics, and probably own an tier VIII yourself, in which you do decent.) or B. They rushed up the lines and play a tier VIII or so while having no clue of how the game works. Because when at tier I it doesn't really matter if you play that well or not, (the team with the most sealclubbers will generally win, XD no offence to those that sealclub) when getting above tier V it will start to matter because the tanks are better balanced, and the average skilllevel has increased greatly when compared to lower tiers.



Dead_in_30_seconds #14 Posted 24 December 2017 - 06:23 PM

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Oh wow Thuis001, you've kinda made my Christmas!

 

Here I was, expecting the usual socks and deodorants, trust me at my age things get a little predictable, and yet here you are perhaps suggesting that I may actually be looked upon as a newbie and not a noob.

 

That Sir, was not on my letter to Santa, but is a very welcome surprise indeed.

 

Many thanks for your post, and have a great Christmas.



Sessine #15 Posted 24 December 2017 - 10:09 PM

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The tier 4/5 thing....this also depends on the line you are playing. If the tier 4 is ok stay with it but sometimes the tier 5 is so much better that you might want to play that instead (Type 95 vs pre buff OI Exp, M5 vs Chaffee). 

 

Also if you want to unlock some specific HT lines they only start at 5.

Or if you decide to play arty skipping the low tier tank lines (so getting USA arty via Chaffee, Brit arty via Valentine or S-51 via KV-2). 

 

Low tier arty is just plain annoying. Those Pz 1C's will clip everything they spot before your shell lands. 

 

Don't be afraid to move up the lines as long if you have researched all modules and the tanks you can with earned XP. If you want more hold out for the Ace (or the next crew retraining discount...those intervals have become long nowadays). 

 

One other thing is to keep in mind the crew training. Especially when you start with 75% crews they will not be at 100% after completing the research if if the tank is ok and you enjoy it finish the crew grind to 100% and start training the skills. Due to the way the skill points work training the first 50% of the set is pretty quick and skills stay active after crew retraining which leaves the base skill at 90%. So if you don't mind playing the lower tier tank a bit more it can be rewarding (especially for camo on TDs, LTs. HTs start at 5 and/or are better or equal at tier 5 so you can train there).

 

 



de6thmet6lfre6k #16 Posted 26 December 2017 - 04:43 PM

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First of all I wanted to thank Dead_in_30_seconds for creating this thread and helpful insights.

to react on your first post;

 

(Dead_in_30_seconds 1st post)

 When we first start playing this game, it's almost impossible to stop ourselves from charging forward, guns blazing, only to discover that we are a smoking wreck within the first few minutes.

The reason? It's because we don't understand that this game, and always remember it is a game, actually requires practice, strategy, and an understanding that we light tankers have a very specific role to play.

 

Guilty! :/ I did that a lot of games in the beginning, especially at tier I-III. And I don't think this is -just- a 'game', its more like a secondary full-time job/study. The amount of depth, information, tactics and what not is so overwhelming that new players are almost guaranteed to fail the first few hundred games. And about roles, well. 3 years ago when I started to play this game I was definately a newbie/noob, I was new to the game but didn't study the information about tactics and stuff. Then after losing a lot, I stopped playing. 2,5/3 years later I decided to give it a try once more. I've been playing for a little more than a week now, played 500 battles or so. And I have to say when you study the game in depth the game becomes more fun. especially if you looked up some map tactics and how to fulfill some specific roles and it worked as it was advertised.

 

 

(Dead_in_30_Seconds 1st post)

 Generally speaking, a noob is someone who may, or may not, be new to the game, but for some reason is unable, or plain refuses, to learn the basics.[...]

 

The other is newbie. Now this one, on the surface, is not that much different.[...]

 

My definition of a noob is similar but a bit different. A noob in my opinion is someone who does understand the game. just fail horribly with the intention of failing horribly just to make other players' life misserable.

And newb, is different imo because he/she doesn't understand the game and is still exploring.

 

(Dead_In_30_Seconds 1st post)

 [...] Don't give up, and don't uninstall it just because half of central Europe say's you should.

 

Yeah thats the big freakin' con to this game. As players who flame noobs and newbs alike, don't see the difference between the two, atleast they don't act like it. So as a new player its kinda big turn off with players who going to insult you in PM after the battle. I even had a player insulting me few days after the battle took place... I just thought, dafuq get a life. ignored and blacklisted

 

On WoWs on the other hand, you have the occasional cranky player who is frustrated and takes that frustration to the team but overall most chats in battles were 'friendly' if not constructed criticism.

on WoWp, there they are a bit more cranky/toxic than on WoWs, but definitely less than on WoT.

 

 (Thuis001 on 24/12/17)

 Indeed, there is a large difference between a n00b and a newby.

The first one is a player that has 10k or so games played and still hasn't learned the basics. These players are a pain in the *ss because they also play higher tiers, where them being horrible makes much more of a difference. These players generally have no hopes of being good, like EVER. They will get a lot of flak from the "better" players mainly because well, they suck and they have been doing so forever.

 Thuis001 I have to disagree on this, not on your definition but on how it turns out practicaly. I have around 1200 games or so and I always get flamed by players when I made a mistake or whatever. Seems to me like in the game people don't make a distinction between the two and only on fora excist that. Minus the players you meet ingame who do make the distinction. and sometimes gives you advice.

 

Plus going back to what I mentioned before about that this is not just a game but a secondary full-time job, is that when you make a mistake and someone is flaming you for it, is like you're not allowed to make a mistake and if you do, they'll crucify you mercilessly, without even checking if the player in question has the mentioned 10k games or so. So yeah, just a game is what you do for fun, a job you do for a living and looking at how people can react, is like their lifes depends on it (in RL).

 

(Thuis001 ~same post)

 The only reason newbies will get flak is mainly: A. They bought a tier VIII prem and derp around there with no clue of what to do. [...] B. They rushed up the lines and play a tier VIII or so while having no clue of how the game works.[...]

 

I have to agree. sadly I am/was that kind of player. Well 3 years ago before I quit WoT, with my birthday my mom wanted me to give me a present but didn't know what to give so she asked me and I answered that I would like a tank in this game. So I chose a tank to my liking and my mom bought me a E25 for me. So yeah, that was a bit noobish/newbish of me, but i'm glad I chose that because now the E25 is gone from sale.

 

The last few days I committed myself to be better in a E25, watched replays and youtube vids about the E25, researched the maps that I had some difficulties with and well, with some effect I managed to balance my winrate to +- 50%. (atm its a tad lower than that but nvm) But still have a hard time dealing with T8 (especially when run out of gold-ammo)

 

So summerized; The game/job is fun when you know what to do, the guides on the fora and youtube are great! the flaming players definitely not, good thing there is a blacklist for that.

 

anyways. merry christmass everyone

 

PS: forgive me my grammar and typo's, english is not my native language =)

 

Edit: I have a tip too for my fellow new players; don't rush the techtree and take your time, otherwise when you get to T4 or higher you will get wrecked by players who did have the patience to grind the tanks.


Edited by de6thmet6lfre6k, 26 December 2017 - 04:49 PM.


Dead_in_30_seconds #17 Posted 26 December 2017 - 10:35 PM

    Warrant Officer

  • Player
  • 5173 battles
  • 699
  • [T-D-U] T-D-U
  • Member since:
    11-07-2017

Greetings fellow tankers. Fed up with turkey yet?

 

I would like to thank de6thmet6lfre6k for taking the time to post. His (her?) points, along with those who were also kind enough to post, seem to be in general agreement that the best advice for those endeavoring to improve is practice, practice, practice. Then, if you want to take a break from practicing, learn the maps and vehicle characteristics thoroughly, before returning to practice

 

Over the last few days I have been studying the games that ended in defeat to see if I could glean anything useful from them, and I've noticed a couple of things which appear to be forming a pattern. I'd be interested to know your thoughts.

 

In all the losses where we were heavily defeated, 15-1, 15-2, 15-4 etc, there was almost no 'team-work' of any kind. To quote my initial post "...always play as part of a team, even if no-one else seems to want to..."

Now of course, you'll never be able to force people to play as a team if they don't want to, but that doesn't mean you can't. For example, if you see a team-mate pinned to a corner, don't be afraid to talk to them. Tell them that you are going to draw the enemy fire and they should get ready to move. This is especially useful for a medium tank to hear. You are in a fast tank and stand less chance of being hit, but the enemy can't afford to let you flank them, so will normally swing his turret towards even if they don't move. This few seconds may be all it takes for your team-mate to pop out and inflict some damage.

Similarly, 2, or even 3, LT's with a heavy in their sights, will stand a much better chance of taking them out if you work together, rather than merrily attacking one at a time and blaming each other for not destroying them.

 

Another thing that comes to mind is an indication of our natural reaction to be cautious. It's kind of a general, sweeping statement, but I would recommend that as new players, we should play slightly more aggressively. Now of course, I do not mean 100 mph with our eyes tight shut, nor do I mean driving up to the first TD you see and daring him to fire at you, 'coz he will, and you'll die!

What I mean is to sometimes get more involved in the fight. Find somewhere closer to the front line where you can snipe at a few targets. Drive into enemy territory along the backside of a ridge to see if you can get some spotting done. In general, just be more involved in the action.

The worst thing that will happen is that your tank gets blown to smithereens, but that's OK because, contrary to what some appear to believe, It's just a game, no-one actually dies.

The best thing is that you realise that you score more damage and XP than you used to, and that you CAN survive and win battles.

 

Final thought. Use your defeats as learning tools, they can often tell you much more than easy wins.

 


Edited by Dead_in_30_seconds, 26 December 2017 - 10:42 PM.


cellaman7 #18 Posted 26 December 2017 - 10:59 PM

    Brigadier

  • Player
  • 34752 battles
  • 4,553
  • [T-D-U] T-D-U
  • Member since:
    03-31-2013

To dead_in 30 seconds.... If you want to get a good learning and earning tank I would strongly recommend buying the tier 4 Valentine II. They are less than £5 and NEVER see higher than tier 4 with its special Match Making. Even if you fill it with 100% premium ammo you still make credits!

 

As for being called a noob. I had someone call me a noob yesterday. I had 3 kills, more than twice my own hit points in damage and we had just about won the game. I was parked trying to get a shot on one of the enemies last tanks, then I see in chat "Valentine, move you noob"!!!

 

So you get idiots out there who use the word noob when in fact they are the noobs because they can't understand why you are doing what you are doing. Oh, and they are usually the ones who usually died in 30 seconds. Water off a ducks back to me.


Edited by cellaman7, 26 December 2017 - 11:03 PM.


Baldrickk #19 Posted 26 December 2017 - 11:01 PM

    Field Marshal

  • Player
  • 32165 battles
  • 16,715
  • [-MM] -MM
  • Member since:
    03-03-2013

 It's a pleasure reading this thread. 

I've played enough battles that I've kinda forgotten about being a newbie. 
Which of course makes it even nicer to see advice being given that is such good quality. 
I'd say it's about 95% of the way there, and that last 5% is where it gets hard to learn and also hard to quantify, so this is about the best you are likely to find. 

What can I add to this guide?
Firstly; if anyone reading this hasn't, download and read the tankers guide, written by the (unfortunately now gone)  SGTA training academy clan: http://forum.worldof...nkers-handbook/
There you will find a solid guide to most topics. 

As for personal advice:

Field Marshal Helmuth Karl Bernhard Graf von Moltke

 The tactical result of an engagement forms the base for new strategic decisions because victory or defeat in a battle changes the situation to such a degree that no human acumen is able to see beyond the first battle. In this sense one should understand Napoleon's saying: "I have never had a plan of operations."

Therefore no plan of operations extends with any certainty beyond the first contact with the main hostile force

 It's cliche, but damn is it true.

By all means plan ahead, but you cannot predict every action the enemy take (or even your allies). You will need to change those plans as the situation dictates.

 

It goes further than that. Your plan should involve escape clauses.  Any push should have at least one route through which you should be able to safely retreat, as the most common relaxation is "I should not be here right now" when an entire line of enemy guns appears in front of you.

Likewise, weigh up as many options as you can think of, and keep evaluating them throughout as the battle changes. Eliminate the impossible and create new plans as the opportunities arise.

And always keep one eye glued to the minimap. 

 

Love the name by the way OP.

Feel free to send me a platoon invite if you see me around and would like some pointers or just a buddy to play with.

 



Dead_in_30_seconds #20 Posted 27 December 2017 - 03:18 AM

    Warrant Officer

  • Player
  • 5173 battles
  • 699
  • [T-D-U] T-D-U
  • Member since:
    11-07-2017

Had to share this with you as it illustrates a very important, yet not often mentioned aspect of a successful tanker.

 

http://wotreplays.eu/site/4033929?secret=93c8b0e32b4f25add778b822caa008b4

 

Around 16 seconds into the game, the more experienced and eagle-eyed of you will notice that I make a very tiny, very subtle error.

 

I won't go into detail here, suffice to say that, whilst you are examining the mini-map, identifying the strengths and weaknesses of yours and the enemy's team, and expertly formulating a strategy that will save the entire human race, it is essential that a commander has an almost instinctive knowledge of the exact location of his tank, a keen awareness of his immediate environment, and the possible interaction of the two.

 

Failure to do so can often lead to difficulty!

 

Keep learning, keep tanking, and above all, keep having fun.

 

Morning all.

 

Thanks for the heads up cellaman. The Valentine was a tank I was considering, but then I saw this on Wiki.

 

Pros and Cons

Pros:

 

  • Very good armour for its tier combined with a high HP pool
  • Small size, low profile along with fast gun/track traverse
  • Rapid rate of fire, reasonable accuracy, adequate penetration against tier threes
  • Only sees tier 4 battles, unlike the regular Valentine
  • Very good camo and unlike the Valentine, it retains full camo value on the move

 

Cons:

 

  • Nearly useless penetration for its tier, has serious problems penning some tier 4s even with APCR
  • Only three crew members and dependence on APCR ammo make it poor for both crew training and making credits
  • Weak engine, low speed limit, sluggish reverse, crawls uphill
  • Low ammo capacity

 

I'd appreciate your thoughts, as it seems to be slightly at odds with your suggestion. Has it been nerf'd recently?

 

The other tank I was considering was the Leopard for its HP, armour and ramming abilities. Any words of wisdom you can share will, as always, be much appreciated.

 

One final thought.

Do you reckon I could seriously consider changing my player name? Maybe I'm getting carried away, but I feel I'm almost ready to be known as Dead_in_45_seconds.


 





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