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Noobs do's and dont's. A summary of useful tips for new players

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Dead_in_30_seconds #1 Posted 30 December 2017 - 04:18 PM

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Greetings fellow tankers.

 

This thread is a follow on from my original 'Noobs do's and dont's from a noob' thread.

 

Having re-read it a couple of times, I realised two things. Firstly, due to it's length, it was becoming difficult to pick out the wealth of good tips supplied by some very helpful, knowledgeable people, and secondly, it was turning into a 'please help me, I'm useless' kinda forum. This was never my intention. It was designed as a forum for ALL new players who wished to improve, not as some sort of counseling session just for me. My apologies for hijacking my own thread!

 

The intention of this new thread is to distill everything I have learnt into one, easily accessible post, which I hope will prove of some use to anyone who wishes to improve. Wherever possible, I have attributed salient points to the person who raised them by including their username in brackets. If you ever meet them on your World of Tanks journey, pay them huge respect. Without them I would still be shooting my own foot off before I left my cap circle.

 

Here we go.

 

Generally speaking, a noob is someone who may, or may not, be new to the game, but for some reason is unable, or plain refuses, to learn the basics. These are the guys who make the same mistakes over and over and over again. Will often suicide rush into impossible situations, have no regard for their team-mates, block shots, shoot YOU in the arse for no reason, constantly call the rest of their team-mates losers, and generally spoil an otherwise enjoyable game. 

Make it your life's work not to be a noob. (Dead_in_30_seconds)

 

Indeed, there is a large difference between a n00b and a newby.

The first one is a player that has 10k or so games played and still hasn't learned the basics. These players are a pain in the *ss because they also play higher tiers, where them being horrible makes much more of a difference. These players generally have no hopes of being good, like EVER. They will get a lot of flak from the "better" players mainly because well, they suck and they have been doing so forever.

Newby on the other hand are just new players like you. They have essentially this choice: Do I spend time on this game, learn how it works and use the mechanics to my advantage, or not doing this and ending in the group of so called noobs. Newbies will mainly be tolerated, I mean well, everyone sucked the first couple of thousand games. ( I did, and still do sometimes, you probably aren't the best player around and even guys like Quickybaby and Jingles sucked when they first played WoT) The only reason newbies will get flak is mainly: A. They bought a tier VIII prem and derp around there with no clue of what to do. (This is probably the first tip I can give a player: DO NOT, FOR ANY REASON buy a tier VIII prem before you have a good understanding of the mechanics, and probably own an tier VIII yourself, in which you do decent.) or B. They rushed up the lines and play a tier VIII or so while having no clue of how the game works. Because when at tier I it doesn't really matter if you play that well or not, (the team with the most sealclubbers will generally win, XD no offence to those that sealclub) when getting above tier V it will start to matter because the tanks are better balanced, and the average skilllevel has increased greatly when compared to lower tiers. (Thuis001)

 

de6thmet6lfre6k said 'My definition of a noob is similar but a bit different. A noob in my opinion is someone who does understand the game. just fail horribly with the intention of failing horribly just to make other players' life miserable. And newb, is different imo because he/she doesn't understand the game and is still exploring.'

 

When we first start playing this game, it's almost impossible to stop ourselves from charging forward, guns blazing, only to discover that we are a smoking wreck within the first few minutes.

The reason? It's because we don't understand that this game, and always remember it is a game, actually requires practice, strategy, and an understanding that we light tankers have a very specific role to play.

Within the first 60 seconds of the game, we already know where the enemy is. They are in, or very close to, that big red circle. Our team doesn't need you to drive at 100mph, straight up the middle of the map to tell them where they are, they already know.

In the same vein, sitting in your own cap circle also doesn't help. You can try and pretend that you are 'defending the base', but the enemy tanks are miles away, and you are not in a tank that can realistically hold off an attack by the enemy later in the game. (Dead_in_30_seconds).

 

Your job is to support your team-mates. If you see a couple of heavies without a spotter, go join them. Move up the map SLOWLY, allowing them time to slowly push forward. Stay a couple of squares in front of them, and when you light up an enemy, FALL BACK and let them do their job. DO NOT try and peek round the corner to take 0.0005 HP off the enemy tank. All you will do is get in the way of your team-mates shot, get blown to smithereens and cause the enemy player to laugh so hard that snot will come out of his/hers nose.

When/if they do their job, resume your position slightly in front of them, rinse and repeat.You will get spotting damage, increase the chance of a win, and, if you're lucky, gain a tiny bit of respect for your efforts. (Dead_in_30_seconds)

 

The very last thing a heavy tanker wants is to deal with a scout that is probing around in front of him. A skill heavy tankers (hopefully) learn is to sidescrape. Sidescraping = angling your tank in order to increase its effective armour. A sidescraping heavy will want to be on a corner and he won't want anyone right behind him or in front of him. Give him space.

And as you pointed out, the best thing to do is never be a hero. If 13 of your allies are going to one side of the map then just go with them. It is pointless trying to cover the open side of the map by yourself. You can either defend the rearguard of the train of allies or you can take up a position in the vanguard and help keep the train moving. (thestaggy)

 

Also depends what tier, what map, what team and what tank. The role of "light" tanks has changed very much. Whilst you make valid points you describe the game from a year ago.  (Bordhaw)

 

I made the decision very early on that I would not play any tank above tier IV until I was confident that I had begun to grasp the basics.

My rationale was this; Tier I & II will spend their time on either Mittengard or Mines, both of which are available on Proving Ground battle type. Proving Ground gives an excellent opportunity to learn the basics of tank driving. I still find it quite funny to watch players who don't take the time to learn, doing a strange sort of maneuver where they shuffle backwards and forwards seemingly oblivious to how their tank moves, and having an unhealthy attraction to a lump of rock!

One word of warning about Proving Ground. Don't believe that your results have any reflection on 'real' life. Proving Ground will see you destroying loads of tanks, winning 99.9% of battles and barely getting scratched. This is not to be taken seriously. The A in AI on proving ground actually stands for Absent; Not officially true, but incredibly accurate.

The other reason for my choice was that tier IV will quite often see you pitted against tier VI. This is more than enough challenge for anyone with less than 2000+ battles under their belt. (Dead_in_30_seconds)

 

This is good advice. I've tried to do this myself. I did buy a tier 6 premium (Cromwell B) but I'm terrible with it. I meet tier 8s who are far more experienced than I am. Currently I'm trying to master tier 5 and that's a challenge enough. Every time you go up a new tier, you meet new tanks that you have to learn to fight against, and this takes time. Plus I'm still learning the nuances of all the maps, and this is taking longer than I thought, especially since knowing how to fight a particular map in a light tank won't help much when you are in a medium, heavy or TD, so you end up having to think of the map in a different way. But there's no need to rush. There's so much to learn - so many tanks and their different styles - that it pays to take your time. And getting better at your particular tier makes the game more enjoyable. (Tramp_in_Armour)

 

The tier 4/5 thing....this also depends on the line you are playing. If the tier 4 is ok stay with it but sometimes the tier 5 is so much better that you might want to play that instead (Type 95 vs pre buff OI Exp, M5 vs Chaffee). (Sessine)

 

In all the losses where we were heavily defeated, 15-1, 15-2, 15-4 etc, there was almost no 'team-work' of any kind. To quote my initial post "...always play as part of a team, even if no-one else seems to want to..."

Now of course, you'll never be able to force people to play as a team if they don't want to, but that doesn't mean you can't. For example, if you see a team-mate pinned to a corner, don't be afraid to talk to them. Tell them that you are going to draw the enemy fire and they should get ready to move. This is especially useful for a medium tank to hear. You are in a fast tank and stand less chance of being hit, but the enemy can't afford to let you flank them, so will normally swing his turret towards even if they don't move. This few seconds may be all it takes for your team-mate to pop out and inflict some damage.

Similarly, 2, or even 3, LT's with a heavy in their sights, will stand a much better chance of taking them out if you work together, rather than merrily attacking one at a time and blaming each other for not destroying them.

 

Another thing that comes to mind is an indication of our natural reaction to be cautious. It's kind of a general, sweeping statement, but I would recommend that as new players, we should play slightly more aggressively. Now of course, I do not mean 100 mph with our eyes tight shut, nor do I mean driving up to the first TD you see and daring him to fire at you, 'coz he will, and you'll die!

What I mean is to sometimes get more involved in the fight. Find somewhere closer to the front line where you can snipe at a few targets. Drive into enemy territory along the backside of a ridge to see if you can get some spotting done. In general, just be more involved in the action.

The worst thing that will happen is that your tank gets blown to smithereens, but that's OK because, contrary to what some appear to believe, It's just a game, no-one actually dies.

The best thing is that you realise that you score more damage and XP than you used to, and that you CAN survive and win battles.

Final thought. Use your defeats as learning tools, they can often tell you much more than easy wins. (Death_in_30_seconds)

 

It's a pleasure reading this thread. 

I've played enough battles that I've kinda forgotten about being a newbie. 
Which of course makes it even nicer to see advice being given that is such good quality. 
I'd say it's about 95% of the way there, and that last 5% is where it gets hard to learn and also hard to quantify, so this is about the best you are likely to find. 

What can I add to this guide?
Firstly; if anyone reading this hasn't, download and read the tankers guide, written by the (unfortunately now gone)  SGTA training academy clan: http://forum.worldof...nkers-handbook/
There you will find a solid guide to most topics. (Baldrickk)

 

It goes further than that. Your plan should involve escape clauses.  Any push should have at least one route through which you should be able to safely retreat, as the most common relaxation is "I should not be here right now" when an entire line of enemy guns appears in front of you.

Likewise, weigh up as many options as you can think of, and keep evaluating them throughout as the battle changes. Eliminate the impossible and create new plans as the opportunities arise.

And always keep one eye glued to the minimap. (Baldrickk)

 

Had to share this with you as it illustrates a very important, yet not often mentioned aspect of a successful tanker.

 

http://wotreplays.eu/site/4033929?secret=93c8b0e32b4f25add778b822caa008b4

 

Around 16 seconds into the game, the more experienced and eagle-eyed of you will notice that I make a very tiny, very subtle error.

I won't go into detail here, suffice to say that, whilst you are examining the mini-map, identifying the strengths and weaknesses of yours and the enemy's team, and expertly formulating a strategy that will save the entire human race, it is essential that a commander has an almost instinctive knowledge of the exact location of his tank, a keen awareness of his immediate environment, and the possible interaction of the two.

Failure to do so can often lead to difficulty! (Dead_in_30_seconds)

 

It all comes down to one thing "Situational Awareness". When you sense danger then bail out.

50% of my games involve driving and shooting, the other 50% is looking at my mini map and deciding where the best position to be is. Depending what tank you are in of course and what tier the MM has thrown you in.

3000 games before i learnt the maps and main encounter points. 6000 games before I learnt how to use my tank effectively.

You have a long way to go but keep plugging away! (cellaman7)

 

One last thing. I posted a replay of a tier V battle when I took the plunge in my development, and received what is possibly the best analysis I have ever seen. Watch, read, learn.

 

http://wotreplays.eu/site/4038875?secret=93c8b0e32b4f25add778b822caa008b4

 

Looks like you fitted the optics. You've got good view range now. That's your greatest weapon here. On Erlenberg, it's important to capture the castle on your side of the river, but since two scouts went in that direction already, it's okay to have gone in the direction you did. Essentially, you're scouting for the Excelsior and TDs that came behind you. Personally, I'd have driven fast straight to the hill. It may feel risky, but if you stay on your side of the slope, the tanks behind you can cover you, provided you stay in their view. As it was, the enemy A-20 got to the top of the hill first. He is successfully scouting for his side, and potentially saw your Excelsior and TDs. Because they saw the A-20, and there were no allied tanks at the hill, they stopped, meaning the enemy won the hill.

 

The route you yourself took, putting yourself in a passive spotting position, doesn't help your team much. You are too far away and can only see the enemy when they crest the hill. Sitting looking for targets to shoot yourself, you are acting more like a medium here. Your team has no idea what other enemy tanks are behind the hill slopes, and are therefore blind. If you had made it to the foot of the first slope, you would have met the A-20, but your team mates would have driven it off. You could then have poked up over the crest (just to one side) to spot what else might have been there, and then pulled quickly back (hopefully without getting hit), to see if your allies come up to your position. If they had chosen to stay where they were, you would have then stayed there, since going on alone would have resulted in your death. But at least your presence might have deterred the enemy from shooting from the top at your team mates. Anyway, you chose a different position, so let's see what happened next.

 

Okay, you spotted the A-20 again, and your team mate destroyed him. This is the perfect spotting role. Unfortunately, from your position, you are blind, and, like your team mates, do not know what other enemies are on the hill. From here, you could have gone up the red line and attempted to poke over the next hill crest. Because you did not go to the hill at the beginning, you now face an open dash between your chosen hill and the next hill, which is a risk. You would need to rely on your speed and the covering fire of your team mates. As it is, you sit there for too long. If you had been spotted in that position, on the slope facing your enemies, you would have been in trouble as you had no cover other than a tree (an enemy scout popping over the ridge could have spotted you through that tree, and then you would have had to race back over your own hill, hoping to survive).

 

I see you have Sixth Sense, and you were spotted, even though you destroyed the Luchs. Looking at the mini-map, the enemy has won the castle side of the map, your team has been slaughtered, and your team has been unable to win your side of the map. There was nothing you could have done about the castle side, but you could have led your team at least to the hill on your side to strengthen your team's position. As it is, they are vulnerable and edging closer to the river. You have three choices now, and none of them are great. You could have raced back to your cap zone to try and save it. Your arty is dead, however, and the enemy has the high ground, so spotting the enemies coming down to your cap zone might not have achieved much. You likely would have been destroyed if you had gone back across the river. Your second option might have been to race up the red line and try and spot enemies behind the slope, but, by counting the red dots on the map, it seems most of the enemy are elsewhere, and none of your team would have been able to shoot what you spotted. You could have made the enemy a little nervous there if you had spotted them, but, as they are winning, they might have felt bold enough to yolo out and kill you anyway. The third option would have been to go back to the slope where you saw the A-20 and spot or help by shooting the Hetzer by the river. It appears to be using the houses for cover against your team mates, but you might have got a flank shot. Or spotted more tanks that your team mates could shoot at. Let's see what happens next.

 

Ah. After you were spotted, you were still in position for the T-28 to hit and immobilise you. As I said, you are in a bad position once spotted. From that angle, none of your team mates can help you.

 

But it appears one of them was able to shoot at the T-28, giving you some assisted damage, and you hit it, driving it back over the slope. Once your track is repaired, however, you remain in that position, rather than get the hell out. You remain there, focused on the T-28 and hoping it shows itself. Meanwhile, you have only two team mates left, still in a bad position, and a Luchs is sneaking up behind them. Since you have no hope of taking the hill now by yourself, you could have raced back and tried to intercept the Luchs to help your remaining team mates.

 

While you remain focused on the T-28, one of your team mates dies, leaving just one Exelsior who is being stalked by the Luchs and the T-34. Again, you don't go to help.

 

And then, finally, you are alone, still not in cover. Even if you are unspotted, the enemy knows where you were last seen (it's marked on the map) and you are still in that position. It's only a matter of time before they swarm you.

 

You shoot and destroy another Luchs, then you are spotted. Now everybody is shooting at you and you have no cover you can reach in time. You are destroyed as you try to retreat behind the slope.

 

Your team did very badly, and you got half of your team's kills. There probably wasn't much you could do to avoid losing the game, especially once the castle was lost. Had you made it the hill where the A-20 was first spotted, however, that might have encouraged the tanks behind you to come to the hill and perhaps, perhaps, be in a better position for a last stand, instead of stuck on the low ground by the river. They may even have pushed ahead - led by you - down towards the bottom of the map to threaten the enemy cap zone (not very likely, but it would have made your particular 'task force' more dangerous to the enemy.

 

I know there are some amazing players who seem to whizz around in scout tanks, and who often appear to win the battle by themselves, but that is really, really hard, and best left to the pros for now. But even though you are only a light tank, the positions you take can embolden your team to advance sometimes. It does mean taking risks in getting close to the enemy (worse if you suspect they are there but you can't see them yet) but providing you choose your routes carefully, you have the speed to get out of trouble if a gamble doesn't pay off (always make sure you have a large object, like a hill or house, to get behind). And because you have fantastic view range, peeking over a hill top for even one second can potentially light up enemies over a wide area. And when enemies see their light bulbs come on, they become cautious about advancing further, even if you don't fire a shot. Simply lurking behind an important position can effectively 'take it', and encourage team mates to come and secure it.

 

In Erlenberg, your team has either to win one side of the river, or the other. Lose both sides and you lose the game. This is true for many maps, by the way. It's not just about causing damage. 'Winning' key areas of the map will determine how the battle goes. As a fast tank, you have the best chance to get to those key areas (but you then have to stay alive until your team mates reach you - no heroics). Unfortunately, you also have the lightest armour. This is why scouts are hard to play. It's difficult to stay alive. But if you do, you can make a big difference, and win battles that way, even if you don't destroy a single tank. (Tramp_in_Armour)

 

So, there we have it. I'm sure I've missed some things, but I hope not too many, and I hope this helps in some small way.

If you have the time, and the patience, you can read the entirety of the original post on 'Noobs do's and dont's from a noob'.

 

Huge thanks to everyone who took the time to respond to my original thread. I'm not just saying this for the sake of politeness, I am truly indebted to you.

 

Thanks for reading, and, happy tanking to all.

(Dead_in_30_seconds)

 



Uebergewicht #2 Posted 30 December 2017 - 05:14 PM

    Second Lieutenant

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I still remember my first games, having no clue whatsoever, just driving towards the red tenks and clicking because in so many action games, driving a tank is just that... things bounce off of you just because and every shot is a giant explosion that destroys whatever you hit - while the only thing I could explode in WoT was my own tank. Thankfully, playing with experienced friends and reads like this helped me to get better (I can pull some unicum stuff on a good day (and get my butt kicked on some others (but they´re becoming more rare))).

Edited by Uebergewicht, 30 December 2017 - 05:29 PM.


Dead_in_30_seconds #3 Posted 30 December 2017 - 05:17 PM

    Warrant Officer

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Many thanks for the reply Uebergewicht. Response like this make us newbies believe there is a future! :)

 



Dead_in_30_seconds #4 Posted 31 December 2017 - 05:34 PM

    Warrant Officer

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You're a noob if you steadfastly refuse to learn the etiquette and basics of the game.

You're a newbie if you know you're not very good, but you know it and are prepared to invest the time to learn. You will generally be tolerated by other, better players.

 

As a light tank player, support your bigger, better team-mates, but remember to fall back when you have lit up the enemy to allow them space to operate.

 

If you are 'peeking and shooting', allow time to reload before peeking.

 

At the start of the game, don't drive at 100 mph straight towards the enemy base. We already know where they are.

 

If you see parts of the map that aren't well defended, move up to spot. but don't try to be a hero when you spot the enemy. You aren't 'heavy' enough to defend a push, and once you're a dead spotter, the only consistent factor is, YOU'RE DEAD.

 

Your plan should involve escape clauses.  Any push should have at least one route through which you should be able to safely retreat, as the most common relaxation is "I should not be here right now" when an entire line of enemy guns appears in front of you.

Likewise, weigh up as many options as you can think of, and keep evaluating them throughout as the battle changes. Eliminate the impossible and create new plans as the opportunities arise.

And always keep one eye glued to the minimap. (Baldrickk)

 

Another thing that comes to mind is an indication of our natural reaction to be cautious. It's kind of a general, sweeping statement, but I would recommend that as new players, we should play slightly more aggressively. Now of course, I do not mean 100 mph with our eyes tight shut, nor do I mean driving up to the first TD you see and daring him to fire at you, 'coz he will, and you'll die!

What I mean is to sometimes get more involved in the fight. Find somewhere closer to the front line where you can snipe at a few targets. Drive into enemy territory along the backside of a ridge to see if you can get some spotting done. In general, just be more involved in the action.

The worst thing that will happen is that your tank gets blown to smithereens, but that's OK because, contrary to what some appear to believe, It's just a game, no-one actually dies.

The best thing is that you realise that you score more damage and XP than you used to, and that you CAN survive and win battles.

Final thought. Use your defeats as learning tools, they can often tell you much more than easy wins. (Death_in_30_seconds)

 

I made the decision very early on that I would not play any tank above tier IV until I was confident that I had begun to grasp the basics.

My rationale was this; Tier I & II will spend their time on either Mittengard or Mines, both of which are available on Proving Ground battle type. Proving Ground gives an excellent opportunity to learn the basics of tank driving. I still find it quite funny to watch players who don't take the time to learn, doing a strange sort of maneuver where they shuffle backwards and forwards seemingly oblivious to how their tank moves, and having an unhealthy attraction to a lump of rock!

One word of warning about Proving Ground. Don't believe that your results have any reflection on 'real' life. Proving Ground will see you destroying loads of tanks, winning 99.9% of battles and barely getting scratched. This is not to be taken seriously. The A in AI on proving ground actually stands for Absent; Not officially true, but incredibly accurate.

The other reason for my choice was that tier IV will quite often see you pitted against tier VI. This is more than enough challenge for anyone with less than 2000+ battles under their belt. (Dead_in_30_seconds)

 

This is good advice. I've tried to do this myself. I did buy a tier 6 premium (Cromwell B) but I'm terrible with it. I meet tier 8s who are far more experienced than I am. Currently I'm trying to master tier 5 and that's a challenge enough. Every time you go up a new tier, you meet new tanks that you have to learn to fight against, and this takes time. Plus I'm still learning the nuances of all the maps, and this is taking longer than I thought, especially since knowing how to fight a particular map in a light tank won't help much when you are in a medium, heavy or TD, so you end up having to think of the map in a different way. But there's no need to rush. There's so much to learn - so many tanks and their different styles - that it pays to take your time. And getting better at your particular tier makes the game more enjoyable. (Tramp_in_Armour)

 



Thuis001 #5 Posted 31 December 2017 - 06:55 PM

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For credit Management:

 

If you are new to the game, credits are fairly scarce. So it is important to spend them wisely. Later once you play for a longer time, credits will become a bit more available yet having your finances correct is still very usefull.

Where to start, first of, sell stuff you don't need, and I am not talking about equipment here, that will be usefull later on, I am talking about stuff like large repair kits and medkits, these are (besides sales) 10k each, and while 1 or 2 won't help much, later on you will have dozens of them, and if you sell them you get a ton of money. Also, don't spend your credits on useless stuff, for example, I would consider spending credits on crews or equipment below tier V useless, exept if you are for example talking about moveable equipment. Or a tank that you really want to keep around, because it is fun (Pz. I C is an example, this thing is really fun to play with friends and having a good crew in it will allow you to seal club later on (don't blame me, clubbing seals can be fun every once in a while)

 

Equipment:

While your first concern won't be equipment, from tier V onwards this becomes a must, If you have the credits to spare, buy some in advance, because sales seem to become rarer and rarer. What equipment do you need to get, Gun rammers. On every non-autoloading tank from tier V up I believe (and some lowertier tanks) can use a gun rammer, if you can mount one, do this before playing any games in it. And if there is a sale, and you've got the credits, buy more then you need. If you need credits later on? well, sell one you won't loose any money, but will have one in stock when you get a new tank. Having 1 or preferably 2 sets of binocs and camo net is very nice, because since you can move them they become very usefull early on. These you can mount on lower tier tanks, and will be very nice. (yes these are very expensive to buy, even on sale, but are well worth it) when coming to higher tiers, having optics and vstabs in your depot is basicly a must, because they will form the standard equipment loadout on most tanks.

 

Consumables:

These are on sale more often then Equipment however, they are also really nice to buy some. If you have the money to spare, and don't plan on buying something big in the near future, stock on on them, there is no shame in buying 100 repair kits or more. They are well worth it, because you make money a bit faster during the games where you put from this stockpile. Large equipment is a fairly common reward, and while some players use them they are mainly 10k credit packs. The auto extinguishers can be very nice, but the other two you should sell, just as any food you get. Until you become better-good at the game there is no reason to use something different then repair-med-exting. As these will safe your life.

 

Tanks: after tier IV these become rapidly more expensive, with tier V poking 0,5M and tier VI 0,9-1M they are quickly the biggest purchaches you will do in the game. Buy them only on sale, this will safe you hundreds of thousands to milions of credits, which you can use to equip the tank or buy other tanks with. Remember to sell them outside of sales as they will give you quite a bit of money when you sell them.

 

I hope this was usefull, as the economics in this game can help quite a bit. 


Edited by Thuis001, 31 December 2017 - 06:57 PM.


BringerOfHell #6 Posted 31 December 2017 - 07:15 PM

    Lance-corporal

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Nice text, I want to point out that every time you change a location on a map or find yourself in an unexpected situation, ask yourself: Can my allies support me ?; do I have a direct line of sight on the routes leading to my location ("Can I spot them?) ; Will the flank "fall"? Do I have a positional advantage over the enemy? Do I have a route that I can safely escape, and most importantly try to imagine the role of an enemy (What would I do  in their place?). There is always time to fight and time for " escape ", learn to escape from death  and you will improve your gameplay and  thus greatly influence the victory of your team.

 

 


Edited by BringerOfHell, 31 December 2017 - 07:23 PM.


Dead_in_30_seconds #7 Posted 31 December 2017 - 07:34 PM

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    11-07-2017

Thanks to both for your replies.

 

If only I had had this level of advice available when i started, my journey would have been far less arduous.

 

With the information contained in this, and my previous thread 'Noobs do's and dont's from a noob', I can't help thinking that there's a 'sticky' here waiting to be born.

 

To all that have contributed, you have my thanks.



Thuis001 #8 Posted 31 December 2017 - 07:43 PM

    Staff Sergeant

  • Player
  • 5981 battles
  • 466
  • [-SBN-] -SBN-
  • Member since:
    05-29-2015

Well, you are still under the 1k games, so you (hopefully) still have a road ahead of you, and thus time to improve, adapt and overcome.

 



Slyspy #9 Posted 01 January 2018 - 03:52 AM

    Field Marshal

  • Player
  • 14202 battles
  • 16,734
  • [T-D-U] T-D-U
  • Member since:
    12-07-2011
Nice idea for a thread but it is too wordy. You should trim it down a bit and structure it so that each element of the game has its own section with a subtitle for easy reference. A bit like Thius001 has done with his original reply. 

pewdiepie_209 #10 Posted 02 January 2018 - 06:19 PM

    Private

  • Player
  • 123 battles
  • 1
  • Member since:
    06-14-2015
So I am a newbie to here so I wanted to ask for opinion, I just collected 3k gold and about to buy a tank, should I buy a SU100Y or a Churchill III? Thanks in advance!

MiaMica #11 Posted 02 January 2018 - 06:56 PM

    Corporal

  • Player
  • 779 battles
  • 194
  • [WGNET] WGNET
  • Member since:
    05-02-2017

View Postpewdiepie_209, on 02 January 2018 - 05:19 PM, said:

So I am a newbie to here so I wanted to ask for opinion, I just collected 3k gold and about to buy a tank, should I buy a SU100Y or a Churchill III? Thanks in advance!

 

dont waste gold for crap prem shi :)

Dead_in_30_seconds #12 Posted 02 January 2018 - 07:29 PM

    Warrant Officer

  • Player
  • 2643 battles
  • 598
  • [T-D-U] T-D-U
  • Member since:
    11-07-2017

View Postpewdiepie_209, on 02 January 2018 - 05:19 PM, said:

So I am a newbie to here so I wanted to ask for opinion, I just collected 3k gold and about to buy a tank, should I buy a SU100Y or a Churchill III? Thanks in advance!

 

Hi pewdiepie_209, thanks for the question.

 

Just to make sure I'm not making incorrect assumptions, newbie with 20 battles who's been a member since 2015?? 

New account, or just a player without much free time?


Edited by Dead_in_30_seconds, 02 January 2018 - 07:30 PM.


Dead_in_30_seconds #13 Posted 02 January 2018 - 07:31 PM

    Warrant Officer

  • Player
  • 2643 battles
  • 598
  • [T-D-U] T-D-U
  • Member since:
    11-07-2017
Not sure what happened to my last post. Newbie since 2015?




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