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Not tanks, but planes (including ground attack)

10th July

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arthurwellsley #1 Posted 09 July 2018 - 05:26 PM

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If you are in London tomorrow the RAF is doing a flypast on the Mall of 100 planes as part of the 100th Birthday celebrations of the RAF. Sadly I am going to a meeting out of town and so will probably not be back in time. Estimated time of fly past is begin 1pm and take about 9 minutes. Should be visible (and probably audible) in quite alot of central London.

 

Full details;

 

https://www.raf.mod....y-celebrations/


Edited by arthurwellsley, 09 July 2018 - 06:20 PM.


Grand_Moff_Tano #2 Posted 09 July 2018 - 05:30 PM

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Going to include the F-35B as well, which in my opinion is a waste of money when they are to be placed on our 2 new Super Helicopter Assault Ships.

arthurwellsley #3 Posted 09 July 2018 - 05:46 PM

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View PostGrand_Moff_Tano, on 09 July 2018 - 04:30 PM, said:

Going to include the F-35B as well, which in my opinion is a waste of money when they are to be placed on our 2 new Super Helicopter Assault Ships.

 

I believe the salty sea dogs are referring to those ships by another name, hence the reason for basing fixed wing aircraft aboard them.

Erwin_Von_Braun #4 Posted 09 July 2018 - 05:55 PM

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View PostGrand_Moff_Tano, on 09 July 2018 - 04:30 PM, said:

Going to include the F-35B as well, which in my opinion is a waste of money when they are to be placed on our 2 new Super Helicopter Assault Ships.

 

Carrier Battle groups in general are now starting to show signs of tactical obsolescence - apologies if you're already aware of this, but well worth a watch.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NeCvnt3YlkA

 

I would have loved to have been on the bridge of that carrier and seen the Admirals face :D


 

Worth noting that the sub in question cost about the same as one fighter on the deck of that carrier.

 



Grand_Moff_Tano #5 Posted 09 July 2018 - 05:56 PM

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View Postarthurwellsley, on 09 July 2018 - 04:46 PM, said:

 

I believe the salty sea dogs are referring to those ships by another name, hence the reason for basing fixed wing aircraft aboard them.

 

They fit fixed wing aircraft on the last class of Helicopter carriers. Harriers if I recall correctly.

arthurwellsley #6 Posted 09 July 2018 - 06:18 PM

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View PostErwin_Von_Braun, on 09 July 2018 - 04:55 PM, said:

 

Carrier Battle groups in general are now starting to show signs of tactical obsolescence - apologies if you're already aware of this, but well worth a watch.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NeCvnt3YlkA

 

I would have loved to have been on the bridge of that carrier and seen the Admirals face :D


 

Worth noting that the sub in question cost about the same as one fighter on the deck of that carrier.

 

 

In the 1970's my father-in-law was flying regular interceptor patrols around the UK as part of the cold war. Early one morning he says to his wingman, lets go and buzz the navy. So the two jets swing out to sea and then come towards land as the sun is rising with it directly behind them on an "attack" run on the "deck" at about mach 2. My father-in-fly describes it as "popping over the sea wall and being confronted by a wall of grey", and standing the "bird" on it's tail (might be some hyperbole in here).

 

What he had not realised was that there was a visiting USA aircraft carrier being helped into a berth by tugs. The radio went wild, and the wingman said "you're for it now", and my father-in-law replied "I think not, I have just proved they need to increase their air defences to lower down, they should be thanking me for pointing out a chink in their armour". He got away with not being Court marshaled, the whole thing was quietly forgotten, but he never rose above Wing Commander.

 

Aircraft carriers have been vulnerable to attack since the nineteen seventies.


Edited by arthurwellsley, 09 July 2018 - 06:19 PM.


Erwin_Von_Braun #7 Posted 09 July 2018 - 06:25 PM

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View Postarthurwellsley, on 09 July 2018 - 05:18 PM, said:

 

In the 1970's my father-in-law was flying regular interceptor patrols around the UK as part of the cold war. Early one morning he says to his wingman, lets go and buzz the navy. So the two jets swing out to sea and then come towards land as the sun is rising with it directly behind them on an "attack" run on the "deck" at about mach 2. My father-in-fly describes it as "popping over the sea wall and being confronted by a wall of grey", and standing the "bird" on it's tail (might be some hyperbole in here).

 

What he had not realised was that there was a visiting USA aircraft carrier being helped into a berth by tugs. The radio went wild, and the wingman said "you're for it now", and my father-in-law replied "I think not, I have just proved they need to increase their air defences to lower down, they should be thanking me for pointing out a chink in their armour". He got away with not being Court marshaled, the whole thing was quietly forgotten, but he never rose above Wing Commander.

 

Aircraft carriers have been vulnerable to attack since the nineteen seventies.

 

Best thing is, the first thing the yanks did was purchase one of the subs and 'borrowed' the crew for a year to show them how it's done.

What was your father-in-law flying just out of curiosity?

 

 



arthurwellsley #8 Posted 09 July 2018 - 06:28 PM

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View PostErwin_Von_Braun, on 09 July 2018 - 05:25 PM, said:

 

Best thing is, the first thing the yanks did was purchase one of the subs and 'borrowed' the crew for a year to show them how it's done.

What was your father-in-law flying just out of curiosity?

 

 

 

He was a pilot for BAC Electric Lightnings and F4 Phantoms during that period so could be either. I am not even sure which base he was flying from as he moved around.

WoT_RU_Doing #9 Posted 09 July 2018 - 06:34 PM

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A minor correction but the ships the Royal Navy used to fly Harriers and helicopters from were "Through-Deck Cruisers".

And now a question...was the flypast delayed until tomorrow so that everyone forgets that the RAF was actually formed on April Fool's Day?



Erwin_Von_Braun #10 Posted 09 July 2018 - 06:34 PM

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View Postarthurwellsley, on 09 July 2018 - 05:28 PM, said:

 

He was a pilot for BAC Electric Lightnings and F4 Phantoms during that period so could be either. I am not even sure which base he was flying from as he moved around.

 

Lols indeed - the Lightning wasn't so much an aircraft as a rocket with a couple of wings attached!

He must have had balls of steel to pilot either one of those planes.

Respect where it is due.:honoring:



WindSplitter1 #11 Posted 09 July 2018 - 08:41 PM

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Il-2 Sturmovik 1946 ftw

rsanders5 #12 Posted 09 July 2018 - 09:52 PM

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View Postarthurwellsley, on 09 July 2018 - 05:18 PM, said:

 

In the 1970's my father-in-law was flying regular interceptor patrols around the UK as part of the cold war. Early one morning he says to his wingman, lets go and buzz the navy. So the two jets swing out to sea and then come towards land as the sun is rising with it directly behind them on an "attack" run on the "deck" at about mach 2. My father-in-fly describes it as "popping over the sea wall and being confronted by a wall of grey", and standing the "bird" on it's tail (might be some hyperbole in here).

 

What he had not realised was that there was a visiting USA aircraft carrier being helped into a berth by tugs. The radio went wild, and the wingman said "you're for it now", and my father-in-law replied "I think not, I have just proved they need to increase their air defences to lower down, they should be thanking me for pointing out a chink in their armour". He got away with not being Court marshaled, the whole thing was quietly forgotten, but he never rose above Wing Commander.

 

Aircraft carriers have been vulnerable to attack since the nineteen seventies.

 

  To be honest aircraft carriers have been vulnerable since the 1940's.

 



arthurwellsley #13 Posted 09 July 2018 - 10:38 PM

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View PostErwin_Von_Braun, on 09 July 2018 - 05:34 PM, said:

 

Lols indeed - the Lightning wasn't so much an aircraft as a rocket with a couple of wings attached!

He must have had balls of steel to pilot either one of those planes.

Respect where it is due.:honoring:

 

Or mad as a hatter.

 

He worked as a test pilot on early Lightnings, and lived which was pretty impressive.

Later on he was seconded to Hawker Siddeley to do development work on the jump jet (we have some photographs of him during this secondment in a civi suit with a white overcoat and extremely shiney shoes standing near an aircraft with other engineers).

 

The other good Lightning story is that the RAF wanted to try to extend the range with drop tanks. They decided to fly one from India to East Africa. The RN were put on notice with ships along the route. Plane develops a problem, so my father-in-law is told to land it in the drink near the closest RN ship and be picked up. He says it's too expensive and why not ask the yanks to put up a tanker from Diego Gracia. So the Yanks put up a tanker, my fath-in-law jettisons his drop tanks, links to the Yank tanker, but then finds the Lightning is losing fuel even faster with the drop tanks gone, so decides he will need to fly the rest of the way attached to the tanker, and because the first one was a rush job they have to send a second full one, and he has to disconnect from the first to the second, but he managed to do it all without blowing anything up, and safely landed the Lightning.

 

He did however crash another Lightning, but that's another story.

 

Lightnings could fly above 80,000ft. My father-in-law talked of flying into the dark, seeing the earth's curature and control of the aircraft becoming interesting (effectively it was space flight). Lightnings could also intercept U2's if set up especially for the task.



NickMustaine #14 Posted 10 July 2018 - 07:39 AM

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Good morning guys, 

I have moved this thread from Gameplay to Off-Topic! 

Have a nice day! :) 


Erwin_Von_Braun #15 Posted 10 July 2018 - 06:14 PM

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View Postarthurwellsley, on 09 July 2018 - 09:38 PM, said:

 

Or mad as a hatter.

 

He worked as a test pilot on early Lightnings, and lived which was pretty impressive.

Later on he was seconded to Hawker Siddeley to do development work on the jump jet (we have some photographs of him during this secondment in a civi suit with a white overcoat and extremely shiney shoes standing near an aircraft with other engineers).

 

The other good Lightning story is that the RAF wanted to try to extend the range with drop tanks. They decided to fly one from India to East Africa. The RN were put on notice with ships along the route. Plane develops a problem, so my father-in-law is told to land it in the drink near the closest RN ship and be picked up. He says it's too expensive and why not ask the yanks to put up a tanker from Diego Gracia. So the Yanks put up a tanker, my fath-in-law jettisons his drop tanks, links to the Yank tanker, but then finds the Lightning is losing fuel even faster with the drop tanks gone, so decides he will need to fly the rest of the way attached to the tanker, and because the first one was a rush job they have to send a second full one, and he has to disconnect from the first to the second, but he managed to do it all without blowing anything up, and safely landed the Lightning.

 

He did however crash another Lightning, but that's another story.

 

Lightnings could fly above 80,000ft. My father-in-law talked of flying into the dark, seeing the earth's curature and control of the aircraft becoming interesting (effectively it was space flight). Lightnings could also intercept U2's if set up especially for the task.

 

Wow

Proper British Nutty Professor - can't .imagine anything like that happening today. I mean, can you imagine where we would be as a nation if the HSE had existed back then?


 



Frostilicus #16 Posted 10 July 2018 - 09:41 PM

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View PostWoT_RU_Doing, on 09 July 2018 - 05:34 PM, said:

A minor correction but the ships the Royal Navy used to fly Harriers and helicopters from were "Through-Deck Cruisers".

And now a question...was the flypast delayed until tomorrow so that everyone forgets that the RAF was actually formed on April Fool's Day?

 

They were only ever known as Through Deck Cruisers to get through parliament, as parliament didn't want the Navy to have any carriers -  they were never known by that term in the Andrew, I can assure you! (I served on one) :)

Grand_Moff_Tano #17 Posted 10 July 2018 - 09:45 PM

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View PostFrostilicus, on 10 July 2018 - 08:41 PM, said:

 

They were only ever known as Through Deck Cruisers to get through parliament, as parliament didn't want the Navy to have any carriers -  they were never known by that term in the Andrew, I can assure you! (I served on one) :)

 

But they were essentially Helicopter Cruisers, really its closest competitor was the Iwo Jima and the new Queen Elizabeth-class will be more on par with the America-class Assault ships.




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