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Light tank? maybe .


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AXIS_OF_RESISTANCE #1 Posted 01 August 2018 - 10:21 PM

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;)



Nethraniel #2 Posted 01 August 2018 - 10:24 PM

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Ok. It's off topic section... But somehow you manage to regularly start topics without any obvious meaning... Care to explain again? 

AXIS_OF_RESISTANCE #3 Posted 01 August 2018 - 10:30 PM

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View PostNethraniel, on 01 August 2018 - 10:24 PM, said:

Ok. It's off topic section... But somehow you manage to regularly start topics without any obvious meaning... Care to explain again? 

 

hmm Polish tanks in WW2 i thought that was obvious :teethhappy:.

Edited by AXIS_OF_RESISTANCE, 01 August 2018 - 10:31 PM.


Nethraniel #4 Posted 01 August 2018 - 10:31 PM

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View PostAXIS_OF_RESISTANCE, on 01 August 2018 - 10:30 PM, said:

 

hmm Poland in WW2 i thought that was obvious :teethhappy:.

 

That is US Cavalry. So, why should that relate to Poland? 

Nethraniel #5 Posted 01 August 2018 - 10:46 PM

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For educational purposes (yes I know, only wikipedia, but it is a good start for reading) 

During the German invasion of Poland in 1939, cavalry formed 10% of the Polish Army.[2] Cavalry units were organised in 11 cavalry brigades, each composed of 3 to 4 cavalry regiments with organic artillery, armoured unit and infantry battalion. Two additional brigades had recently been converted to motorized and armoured units, but they retained their cavalry traditions. In addition, every infantry division had an organic cavalry detachment used for reconnaissance.

In contrast with its traditional role in armed conflicts of the past (even in the Polish-Bolshevik War), the cavalry was no longer seen as a unit capable of breaking through enemy lines. Instead, it was used as a mobile reserve of the Polish armies and was using mostly infantry tactics: the soldiers dismounted before the battle and fought as a standard infantry. Despite media reports of the time, particularly in respect of the Battle of Krojanty, no cavalry charges were made by the Polish Cavalry against German tanks.[3]

Although the cavalrymen retained their Szabla wz. 1934 sabres, after 1937 the lance was dropped and it was issued to cavalrymen as a weapon of choice only. Instead, the cavalry units were equipped with modern armament, including 75 mm guns, tankettes37mm AT guns40mm AA gunsanti-tank rifles and other pieces of modern weaponry.

During the campaign, the brigades were distributed among the Polish armies and served as mobile reserves. In this role, the Polish cavalry proved itself a successful measure in filling the gaps in the front and covering the withdrawal of friendly units. Polish cavalry units took part in most of the battles of 1939 and on several occasions proved to be the elite of the Polish Army.

After the September Campaign, the Polish Army on the Western Front continued its pre-war tradition of Uhlan regiments giving their names to armoured units, while Polish units on the Eastern Front used cavalry as mobile infantry until the end of the war.

After the German invasion of the Soviet Union, several Polish units, including cavalry forces, were formed by the Soviets. One of these units carried out the last Polish cavalry charge at the Battle of Schoenfeld, where a surprise cavalry assault succeeded in overrunning the German defensive positions. 

 

https://en.m.wikiped...rge_at_Krojanty



AXIS_OF_RESISTANCE #6 Posted 01 August 2018 - 11:03 PM

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View PostNethraniel, on 01 August 2018 - 10:46 PM, said:

For educational purposes (yes I know, only wikipedia, but it is a good start for reading) 

During the German invasion of Poland in 1939, cavalry formed 10% of the Polish Army.[2] Cavalry units were organised in 11 cavalry brigades, each composed of 3 to 4 cavalry regiments with organic artillery, armoured unit and infantry battalion. Two additional brigades had recently been converted to motorized and armoured units, but they retained their cavalry traditions. In addition, every infantry division had an organic cavalry detachment used for reconnaissance.

In contrast with its traditional role in armed conflicts of the past (even in the Polish-Bolshevik War), the cavalry was no longer seen as a unit capable of breaking through enemy lines. Instead, it was used as a mobile reserve of the Polish armies and was using mostly infantry tactics: the soldiers dismounted before the battle and fought as a standard infantry. Despite media reports of the time, particularly in respect of the Battle of Krojanty, no cavalry charges were made by the Polish Cavalry against German tanks.[3]

Although the cavalrymen retained their Szabla wz. 1934 sabres, after 1937 the lance was dropped and it was issued to cavalrymen as a weapon of choice only. Instead, the cavalry units were equipped with modern armament, including 75 mm guns, tankettes37mm AT guns40mm AA gunsanti-tank rifles and other pieces of modern weaponry.

During the campaign, the brigades were distributed among the Polish armies and served as mobile reserves. In this role, the Polish cavalry proved itself a successful measure in filling the gaps in the front and covering the withdrawal of friendly units. Polish cavalry units took part in most of the battles of 1939 and on several occasions proved to be the elite of the Polish Army.

After the September Campaign, the Polish Army on the Western Front continued its pre-war tradition of Uhlan regiments giving their names to armoured units, while Polish units on the Eastern Front used cavalry as mobile infantry until the end of the war.

After the German invasion of the Soviet Union, several Polish units, including cavalry forces, were formed by the Soviets. One of these units carried out the last Polish cavalry charge at the Battle of Schoenfeld, where a surprise cavalry assault succeeded in overrunning the German defensive positions. 

 

https://en.m.wikiped...rge_at_Krojanty

 

jeez man you don't get satire.

Nethraniel #7 Posted 02 August 2018 - 06:25 AM

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View PostAXIS_OF_RESISTANCE, on 01 August 2018 - 11:03 PM, said:

 

jeez man you don't get satire.

 

Oh, I do get it, but that horse joke is getting old and I really do not like the ignorance in regards to the Polish cavalry behind it (and I am not Polish).




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