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Radio just ruined my childhood memories


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TheDrownedApe #1 Posted 10 November 2018 - 10:33 AM

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When i was a wee'un there was a famous rhyme we all know (assume it's global). it goes:

 

This little piggy went to market

This little piggy stayed at home

etc

etc

 

Well it's just been pointed out to me that "went to market" didn't mean shopping at the market :confused:

 

I think it's time we scrutinised some more "child rhymes"

 

EDIT: didn't mean to post in gameplay, can a mod move it please, my bad


Edited by Dr_ownape, 10 November 2018 - 10:33 AM.


Strappster #2 Posted 10 November 2018 - 10:37 AM

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Jack & Jill went up the hill

To fetch a pail of water

Jack fell down and broke his crown

And Jill came tumbling after

 

Is about sex. :great:



cro001 #3 Posted 10 November 2018 - 10:43 AM

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Don't you count toes/fingers when you do that rhyme? Would that mean your finger gets chopped off?

Homer_J #4 Posted 10 November 2018 - 10:46 AM

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View PostDr_ownape, on 10 November 2018 - 10:33 AM, said:

 it's just been pointed out to me that "went to market" didn't mean shopping at the market :confused:

 

Errmmm I figured this out when I was about four years old.  Just made it even more funny.  That's what piggies are for.

 

Never understood why piggies were getting roast beef though, that's people food.



Jigabachi #5 Posted 10 November 2018 - 10:55 AM

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A lot of those old stories and rhymes for children are kinda questionable. Or even disturbing.

Best example: "Der Struwwelpeter", from a time when terror and fear was part of every good child's education.

Watch with caution, it still gave me some weird feelings... :ohmy:

 

Spoiler

 


Edited by Jigabachi, 10 November 2018 - 11:02 AM.


wsatnutter #6 Posted 10 November 2018 - 10:58 AM

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Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall;
All the king's horses and all the king's men
Couldn't put Humpty together again.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
in fact humpty was a cross dresser that's a well known fact

 



loot_the_supermarket #7 Posted 10 November 2018 - 11:00 AM

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-10 points for anyone that mentions ring a ring of roses being about the black plague 

Danger__UXB #8 Posted 10 November 2018 - 11:04 AM

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Ring 'o' ring 'o' roses a pocket full of posies...etc..was actually about the London plague..

 

 

 

Quote;..The invariable sneezing and falling down in modern English versions have given would-be origin finders the opportunity to say that the rhyme dates back to the Great Plague. A rosy rash, they allege, was a symptom of the plague, and posies of herbs were carried as protection and to ward off the smell of the disease.

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ring+o+ring+o+roses+meaning&rlz=1C1CHBD_en-GBGB806GB806&oq=ring+o+ring+o+roses+&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l5.16971j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

10:07 Added after 3 minutes

View Postloot_the_supermarket, on 10 November 2018 - 10:00 AM, said:

-10 points for anyone that mentions ring a ring of roses being about the black plague 

 

ninjad:hiding:

Edited by Danger__UXB, 10 November 2018 - 11:05 AM.


250swb #9 Posted 10 November 2018 - 11:23 AM

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View PostDanger__UXB, on 10 November 2018 - 10:04 AM, said:

Ring 'o' ring 'o' roses a pocket full of posies...etc..was actually about the London plague..

 

 

 

Quote;..The invariable sneezing and falling down in modern English versions have given would-be origin finders the opportunity to say that the rhyme dates back to the Great Plague. A rosy rash, they allege, was a symptom of the plague, and posies of herbs were carried as protection and to ward off the smell of the disease.

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ring+o+ring+o+roses+meaning&rlz=1C1CHBD_en-GBGB806GB806&oq=ring+o+ring+o+roses+&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l5.16971j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

10:07 Added after 3 minutes

 

ninjad:hiding:

 

Except it wasn't about the Plague.

Wintermute_1 #10 Posted 10 November 2018 - 11:29 AM

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Georgie Porgie, pudding and pie

kissed the girls and made them cry.

 

Is actually about Harvey Weinstein. The lost verse is about #metoo and using your fortune to get the best legal representation money can buy.



Danger__UXB #11 Posted 10 November 2018 - 11:32 AM

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View Post250swb, on 10 November 2018 - 10:23 AM, said:

 

Except it wasn't about the Plague.

 

Its all debateable but i really will not argue about a childrens nursery ryme..

 

Still;..Since the 20th century, the rhyme has often been associated with the Great Plague which happened in England in 1665, or with earlier outbreaks of the Black Death in England. Interpreters of the rhyme before the Second World War make no mention of this;[24] by 1951, however, it seems to have become well established as an explanation for the form of the rhyme that had become standard in the United Kingdom. Peter and Iona Opie, the leading authorities on nursery rhymes, remarked:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ring_a_Ring_o%27_Roses


Edited by Danger__UXB, 10 November 2018 - 11:33 AM.


Homer_J #12 Posted 10 November 2018 - 11:32 AM

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View Post250swb, on 10 November 2018 - 11:23 AM, said:

 

Except it wasn't about the Plague.

 

Hush.

 

Anyway.

 

Mary had a little lamb

She fed it on cream crackers....



dtdp #13 Posted 10 November 2018 - 11:33 AM

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is are you sleeping brother john  about the Plague?

Karasu_Hidesuke #14 Posted 10 November 2018 - 11:40 AM

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:ohmy:

Danger__UXB #15 Posted 10 November 2018 - 11:43 AM

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View Postdtdp, on 10 November 2018 - 10:33 AM, said:

is are you sleeping brother john  about the Plague?

 

I think that is about a monks responsibility to ring a bell?? (Wiki is your freind)

 

''This translation preserves the musicality but greatly distorts the meaning: the whole point is that the bells are not ringing, because brother John, who is supposed to ring them, is sleeping.[1]

The song concerns a monk's duty to ring the bell for matines. Frère Jacques has apparently overslept, it is time to ring the bell for matines, and someone wakes him up with this song.[2]''

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fr%C3%A8re_Jacques#Theories_of_origin



malachi6 #16 Posted 10 November 2018 - 01:51 PM

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View PostHomer_J, on 10 November 2018 - 10:46 AM, said:

Errmmm I figured this out when I was about four years old.  Just made it even more funny.  That's what piggies are for.

 

Never understood why piggies were getting roast beef though, that's people food.

 

Pigs are omnivorous, waste food is often fed to them.  Which is why pork used the be the largest spreader of human diseases. And explains why pigs got BSE.

__SLICK__ #17 Posted 10 November 2018 - 02:04 PM

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________________________________

Edited by __SLICK__, 11 November 2018 - 10:41 PM.


Search_Warrant #18 Posted 10 November 2018 - 02:26 PM

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View Post250swb, on 10 November 2018 - 10:23 AM, said:

 

Except it wasn't about the Plague.

 

Wasent the "pocket full of posies" basically tissues that had blood on them form coughing?

 

Edit: "A rosy rash, they allege, was a symptom of the plague, and posies of herbs were carried as protection and to ward off the smell of the disease. Sneezing or coughing was a final fatal symptom, and "all fall down" was exactly what happened."

 

Edit2: "The two main variants are the Londonist's claim that the rhyme refers to the Great Plague of 1665, and others' claims that it stems from the Black Death of 1347. ... For supporters of pneumonic plague, the ring is a rosy skin rash, while for supporters of the bubonic plague it's a red inflammation around a black buboe."


Edited by Search_Warrant, 10 November 2018 - 02:29 PM.


Frostilicus #19 Posted 10 November 2018 - 02:47 PM

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Sing a song of sixpence is about the dissolution of the monasteries in Henry VIIIs time - apparently the blackbirds are an allegory for monks

loot_the_supermarket #20 Posted 10 November 2018 - 02:57 PM

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View PostSearch_Warrant, on 10 November 2018 - 01:26 PM, said:

 

Wasent the "pocket full of posies" basically tissues that had blood on them form coughing?

 

Edit: "A rosy rash, they allege, was a symptom of the plague, and posies of herbs were carried as protection and to ward off the smell of the disease. Sneezing or coughing was a final fatal symptom, and "all fall down" was exactly what happened."

 

Edit2: "The two main variants are the Londonist's claim that the rhyme refers to the Great Plague of 1665, and others' claims that it stems from the Black Death of 1347. ... For supporters of pneumonic plague, the ring is a rosy skin rash, while for supporters of the bubonic plague it's a red inflammation around a black buboe."

 

pretty much debunked by historians




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