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New build. Intel vs AMD

PC Gaming New rig Specs Intel vs AMD

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Dead_in_30_seconds #1 Posted 31 May 2019 - 07:40 PM

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Looking to build a new rig, 'coz my old one runs on coal.

 

Tempted by this:

 

Case                       THERMALTAKE V200 TEMPERED GLASS RGB EDITION GAMING CASE

Processor (CPU)     Intel® Core™ i7 Six Core Processor i7-8700k (3.7GHz) 12MB Cache

Motherboard           ASUS® ROG MAXIMUS XI HERO: ATX, LGA1151, USB 3.1, SATA 6GBs - RGB Ready

Memory (RAM)       16GB Corsair VENGEANCE DDR4 2666MHz (2 x 8GB)

Graphics Card        6GB NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX 1660 Ti - HDMI, DP - GeForce GTX VR Ready!

1st Storage Drive    240GB ADATA SU650 2.5" SSD, SATA 6 Gb (520MB/R, 450MB/W)

2nd Storage Drive  500GB SEAGATE BARRACUDA 2.5" SSD, (upto 560MB/sR | 535MB/sW)

Power Supply         CORSAIR 550W TXm SERIES™ SEMI-MODULAR 80 PLUS® GOLD, ULTRA QUIET

Processor Cooling  Corsair H80i V2 Hydro Cooler w/ PCS Ultra Quiet Fans

Thermal Paste        COOLER MASTER MASTERGEL MAKER THERMAL COMPOUND

 

But......

 

Should I go Ryzen instead?

 

Hoping some of you are already running such setups and have some insight.

Thanks for reading

 

DiTS



Nishi_Kinuyo #2 Posted 31 May 2019 - 09:54 PM

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Well, think of it like this:

Intel has had several critical security flaws in their CPUs that all brought down their performance by a couple of % each.

AMD on the other hand has had far fewer such flaws.

Ontop of that, the upcoming Ryzen 3000 series promises equal if not better performance for less money than their Intel counterparts.

 

The PC I'm intending to build in 1½-2 months from now will most likely feature a Ryzen 3000-series CPU, since my current PC is starting to get quite old.

 

I don't know for how much an 8700K is going for where you live, but in my country they're still selling for at least €375 new, while a 9700K goes for €415 or something.

Comparatively, the Ryzen 2700X goes for only €300, while unofficial leaks suggest the Ryzen 3700X might go for €325¹.

¹Based on a leak price list from Singapor listing it for S$500.


_SpartanWarrior_ #3 Posted 31 May 2019 - 10:57 PM

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I would suggest Ryzen,and getting another gpu,not the 1660.

If you are looking for a budget gaming GPU,you can get RX580 8GB Paired with the ryzen.

 

 

22:01 Added after 3 minutes
My oldie i7 920-6GB DDR3-GTX1050 2GB runs fine on HD Maxed out 1080p 50-60fps though,you will have no problems whatever you choose.

Edited by _SpartanWarrior_, 31 May 2019 - 11:01 PM.


Dead_in_30_seconds #4 Posted 31 May 2019 - 11:39 PM

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View PostNishi_Kinuyo, on 31 May 2019 - 08:54 PM, said:

Well, think of it like this:

Intel has had several critical security flaws in their CPUs that all brought down their performance by a couple of % each.

AMD on the other hand has had far fewer such flaws.

Ontop of that, the upcoming Ryzen 3000 series promises equal if not better performance for less money than their Intel counterparts.

 

The PC I'm intending to build in 1½-2 months from now will most likely feature a Ryzen 3000-series CPU, since my current PC is starting to get quite old.

 

I don't know for how much an 8700K is going for where you live, but in my country they're still selling for at least €375 new, while a 9700K goes for €415 or something.

Comparatively, the Ryzen 2700X goes for only €300, while unofficial leaks suggest the Ryzen 3700X might go for €325¹.

¹Based on a leak price list from Singapor listing it for S$500.

 

  • AMD insists its processors are practically immune to Variant 2 Spectre attacks, which siphon data from the kernel. As for Variant 1, you'll have to wait for microcode updates or recompile your software with forthcoming countermeasures described in the technical paper on the Spectre website.
  • The researchers say AMD's Ryzen family is affected by Spectre. Googlers have confirmed AMD FX and AMD Pro cores can allow arbitrary data to be obtained by a user process; the proof-of-concept worked just within one process, though. An AMD Pro running Linux in a non-default configuration – the BPF JIT is enabled – also lets a normal user process read from 4GB of kernel virtual memory.

 

I think it is likely that future i9 processors will be manufactured with the same on-chip defences as the Ryzen 3K series. The i9 is the obvious route for Intel users, IF the vulnerability exploit EVER appears in the open. At the moment, all of the findings have been made using proof of concept research.

 

Interesting to note that US-CERT have downgraded their advice from 'Replace CPU' to 'Apply updates'

 

Fascinating response to my original post Nishi. Thank you for your insight and expertise.



jack_timber #5 Posted 01 June 2019 - 08:19 AM

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Built mine over a year ago, might be 2, was going to get an I7 7700 but when I saw the price of Ryzen 5 1600, nearly 50% less, being a canny Scot decided that Ryzen had a bigger 'bang per buck' over Intel. So AMD it was along with a 1060.

Works fine for WoT, only game I play, get 100 FPS maxed out on HD.



Dead_in_30_seconds #6 Posted 01 June 2019 - 12:47 PM

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View Postjack_timber, on 01 June 2019 - 07:19 AM, said:

Built mine over a year ago, might be 2, was going to get an I7 7700 but when I saw the price of Ryzen 5 1600, nearly 50% less, being a canny Scot decided that Ryzen had a bigger 'bang per buck' over Intel. So AMD it was along with a 1060.

Works fine for WoT, only game I play, get 100 FPS maxed out on HD.

 

Ryzen 7 and 9 will drop into the same board, so maybe a sound choice. i7 and 9 also use the same board. Sooner or later tho', AMD will have to demand a board upgrade, whereas Intel demanded a new board for i7. Short term future-proofed? Time will tell.

Thanks for the post Jack, nail on the head when it comes to pricing.



Panocek #7 Posted 01 June 2019 - 01:08 PM

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MVP question: what resolution/fps you intend to play with? For basic 1920x1080@60Hz you don't need heavy duty rig, so I'd say anything above I5 8400/9400 or Ryzen 5 x600 is going to be somewhat wasted, same with graphics more potent than GTX1660 or RX 580/590.

 

Purchasing K series of Intel processors without intent of overclocking is plain waste of money. And when you do, you need high end motherboard like one you've mentioned as well quality cooler to cope with the heat. And even then, OCing now is more of an art, as times where you could get significant frequency gains are long gone.

 

I7 for gaming is tad overkill, as they rarely show any performance gains over similar spec I5. But akin to Ryzen, spare threads tend to reduce fps drops. Ryzens might provide tad less average fps, but they are considerably cheaper so there is that.

 

I've recently updated mine rig and went with 1st gen Ryzen (1700) simply by virtue of them being end of the line product, so they are often discounted to the disturbing levels, while performance difference between 1st and 2nd gen is 10% or less. Something you can't say the same about price, so 8c/16t cpu for about 130€ AND motherboard manufacturers confirmed BIOS updates to handle 3rd gen Ryzens on their existing MoBos? Dibs.

 

That and in spite of Intel of basically stopping CPU development for half a decade. Only when Ryzen appeared, Intel got motivated to do more than rebrand old cpu and ask Intel level pricetag for it:rolleyes:


Edited by Panocek, 01 June 2019 - 01:36 PM.


Dead_in_30_seconds #8 Posted 01 June 2019 - 01:52 PM

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View PostPanocek, on 01 June 2019 - 12:08 PM, said:

MVP question: what resolution/fps you intend to play with? For basic 1920x1080@60Hz you don't need heavy duty rig, so I'd say anything above I5 8400/9400 or Ryzen 5 x600 is going to be somewhat wasted, same with graphics more potent than GTX1660 or RX 580/590.

 

Purchasing K series of Intel processors without intent of overclocking is plain waste of money. And when you do, you need high end motherboard like one you've mentioned as well quality cooler to cope with the heat. And even then, OCing now is more of an art, as times where you could get significant frequency gains are long gone.

 

I7 for (presumably) gaming is tad overkill, as few games can make use of more than 4-6 threads, but akin to Ryzen, spare cores/threads tend to reduce fps drops. Ryzens might provide tad less average fps, but they are considerably cheaper so there is that.

 

I've recently updated mine rig and went with 1st gen Ryzen (1700) simply by virtue of them being end of the line product, so they are often discounted to the disturbing levels, while performance difference between 1st and 2nd gen is 10% or less. Something you can't say the same about price, so 8c/16t cpu for about 130€ AND motherboard manufacturers confirmed BIOS updates to handle 3rd gen Ryzens on their existing MoBos? Dibs.

 

That and in spite of Intel of basically stopping CPU development for half a decade. Only when Ryzen appeared, Intel got motivated to do more than rebrand old cpu and ask Intel level pricetag for it:rolleyes:

 

Couldn't like this post more.

As someone who upgrades about once in every 100 years, you may not be surprised at how difficult it is to get it the cost approved by a non game playing wife, the 'overkill' element is more to do with the future than the present. You are spot on as far as the rigs spec is concerned, especially when related to WoT.

 

Hugely grateful for the K series point. I could bring my build cost down by not having the ability to overclock, but, and I would really appreciate your thoughts, does the OC ability extend the lifespan of my PC?

You've correctly identified that my intended MB is top end, but I've always preached the mantra that you buy the best you can afford when it comes to PC tech.

 

Huge thanks for the post, even if you've managed to make my decision harder. :great:



Panocek #9 Posted 01 June 2019 - 02:43 PM

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View PostDead_in_30_seconds, on 01 June 2019 - 02:52 PM, said:

 

Couldn't like this post more.

As someone who upgrades about once in every 100 years, you may not be surprised at how difficult it is to get it the cost approved by a non game playing wife, the 'overkill' element is more to do with the future than the present. You are spot on as far as the rigs spec is concerned, especially when related to WoT.

 

Hugely grateful for the K series point. I could bring my build cost down by not having the ability to overclock, but, and I would really appreciate your thoughts, does the OC ability extend the lifespan of my PC?

You've correctly identified that my intended MB is top end, but I've always preached the mantra that you buy the best you can afford when it comes to PC tech.

 

Huge thanks for the post, even if you've managed to make my decision harder. :great:

 

Overclocking was something that enabled my 7 years old i5 2500k to live and still kick [edited]even in 2019, you can't argue with clock jump from 3.3GHz to 4.9GHz (max, on daily I've run on 4.7GHz). But, it was overclocking that ended "life" of this cpu/motherboard. Not due to overheating and frying chip, but CPU (or motherboard VRM) degradation - lasting usage with vastly increased voltages and power consumption took its toll and it became increasingly unstable. So if you want "long lasting PC" and "overclock" in the same sentence, it is going to be superficial overclock, something you would have hard time noticing even in benchmarks, let alone in daily use.

 

Another reason why overclocking is more of an art is max clocks you can hope to achieve in home scenario on Intel are around 5.0-5.2GHz while "boost" clocks most Intel chips operate straight from the box are over 4GHz, if not getting close to 5GHz mark in case of i7 9700k (single core boost 4.9GHz, all cores 4.6GHz)

 

If "Intel overclocking build" is out the window, you can safely take motherboard with cheaper B360/H370 chipset, unless you need features more expensive Z370/390 delivers. Not necessarily cheapest ones, as those tend to skimp on VRM section and its cooling, which may or may not create issues long term.

 

Ryzens on other hand are all unlocked for overclocking by default and you can tinker even on "mid range" B350/450 motherboards, though for harder overclocks you would want more expensive motherboards with improved BIOS OC options and VRM sections. Even then, gains from overclock are going to be mild at best - 1st gen universally ends at 3.9-4.0GHz when running at uncomfortably high voltages compared to base 3.0-3.4GHz, 2nd gen you might push 100-200MHz more but again on high voltages, which can cause long term issues.

 

Mine first gen Ryzen 7 1700 I've overclocked manually from 3.0GHz to 3.8GHz. I could push for 3.9GHz, but that required massive voltage increase, exceeding what is considered safe for long term use. Not bad... until you realize Ryzen 1700 under load boosts single core to 3.7GHz and all cores to 3.2GHz, while manual overclock also disables any power saving features:P

 

If you can't be arsed with tinkering on your own, get X series Ryzens and have basically whatever you would be able to achieve on your own straight from the box, assuming cooling is good enough.

 

 

I guess if you want to go extra cheap bastard, you can pluck out discounted 1st Gen ryzen with good B350/X370 motherboard with confirmed BIOS update to allow 3rd gen Ryzens, so you can upgrade CPU alone in year or two, when 3rd gen gets discounted and replaced with whatever AMD have in pipeline. Tack to that RX580/590 or GTX 1660 assuming you play in FHD@60Hz and you should be good to go for at least few years to come.

 

Some food for thought:


Edited by Panocek, 01 June 2019 - 02:53 PM.


Dead_in_30_seconds #10 Posted 01 June 2019 - 03:14 PM

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View PostPanocek, on 01 June 2019 - 01:43 PM, said:

 

Overclocking was something that enabled my 7 years old i5 2500k to live and still kick [edited]even in 2019, you can't argue with clock jump from 3.3GHz to 4.9GHz (max, on daily I've run on 4.7GHz). But, it was overclocking that ended "life" of this cpu/motherboard. Not due to overheating and frying chip, but CPU (or motherboard VRM) degradation - lasting usage with vastly increased voltages and power consumption took its toll and it became increasingly unstable. So if you want "long lasting PC" and "overclock" in the same sentence, it is going to be superficial overclock, something you would have hard time noticing even in benchmarks, let alone in daily use.

 

Another reason why overclocking is more of an art is max clocks you can hope to achieve in home scenario on Intel are around 5.0-5.2GHz while "boost" clocks most Intel chips operate straight from the box are over 4GHz, if not getting close to 5GHz mark in case of i7 9700k (single core boost 4.9GHz, all cores 4.6GHz)

 

If "Intel overclocking build" is out the window, you can safely take motherboard with cheaper B360/H370 chipset, unless you need features more expensive Z370/390 delivers. Not necessarily cheapest ones, as those tend to skimp on VRM section and its cooling, which may or may not create issues long term.

 

Ryzens on other hand are all unlocked for overclocking by default and you can tinker even on "mid range" B350/450 motherboards, though for harder overclocks you would want more expensive motherboards with improved BIOS OC options and VRM sections. Even then, gains from overclock are going to be mild at best - 1st gen universally ends at 3.9-4.0GHz when running at uncomfortably high voltages compared to base 3.0-3.4GHz, 2nd gen you might push 100-200MHz more but again on high voltages, which can cause long term issues.

 

Mine first gen Ryzen 7 1700 I've overclocked manually from 3.0GHz to 3.8GHz. I could push for 3.9GHz, but that required massive voltage increase, exceeding what is considered safe for long term use. Not bad... until you realize Ryzen 1700 under load boosts single core to 3.7GHz and all cores to 3.2GHz, while manual overclock also disables any power saving features:P

 

If you can't be arsed with tinkering on your own, get X series Ryzens and have basically whatever you would be able to achieve on your own straight from the box, assuming cooling is good enough.

 

 

I guess if you want to go extra cheap bastard, you can pluck out discounted 1st Gen ryzen with good B350/X370 motherboard with confirmed BIOS update to allow 3rd gen Ryzens, so you can upgrade CPU alone in year or two, when 3rd gen gets discounted and replaced with whatever AMD have in pipeline. Tack to that RX580/590 or GTX 1660 assuming you play in FHD@60Hz and you should be good to go for at least few years to come.

 

Some food for thought:

 

Well, I can't fault you for thoroughness, and God knows I'm grateful you have been kind enough to respond.

 

Let me try a different approach.

 

Imagine I give you £1600/1850 euro, what would you build?



Panocek #11 Posted 01 June 2019 - 03:21 PM

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View PostDead_in_30_seconds, on 01 June 2019 - 04:14 PM, said:

 

Well, I can't fault you for thoroughness, and God knows I'm grateful you have been kind enough to respond.

 

Let me try a different approach.

 

Imagine I give you £1600/1850 euro, what would you build?

We're talking brand new, complete computer or you will bring something from old one?



Dead_in_30_seconds #12 Posted 01 June 2019 - 03:27 PM

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From scratch. Nothing coming across except a HDD maybe.

Panocek #13 Posted 01 June 2019 - 04:24 PM

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ElCheapoBastardo:

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/qNBLMZ

Ryzen 5 1600 and GTX 1660 should be more than able to tackle current games in max details with more than comfortable framerates, while both come with surprisingly good stock coolers for cool and quiet. Motherboard will, if not already have 3rd gen Ryzen support with new BIOS and from what I was able to gather have pretty good VRM section, so should be able to handle both overclocking as well 8/12core next gen Ryzens if you want to overkill because reasons.

https://www.asus.com/News/EtaH71Hbjuio1arV

 

1TB SSD for OS and games and 2TB HDD for general storage. Potentially overspent on case, but then I like Fractal Design cases, they are both aesthetic and functional. Added fan extra as 2nd intake to "overpressurize" case, combined with filtered intake it should keep dust buildup to the minimum. Missing optical drive though.

 

At later time I might get around for richer builds

 

AlmostPCmasterrace:

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/62MVj

i5 9600k with (I think) proper motherboard and definitely proper AIO cooling to get them clocks up. RTX 2070 for solid 1440p or adequate 4k, if you're into that territory. Otherwise overkill for 1080p and its going to stay that way for few years I guess. Rest the same.


Edited by Panocek, 01 June 2019 - 05:52 PM.


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Dual Xeon 5660X 

Dead_in_30_seconds #15 Posted 02 June 2019 - 02:39 PM

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View PostPanocek, on 01 June 2019 - 03:24 PM, said:

ElCheapoBastardo:

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/qNBLMZ

Ryzen 5 1600 and GTX 1660 should be more than able to tackle current games in max details with more than comfortable framerates, while both come with surprisingly good stock coolers for cool and quiet. Motherboard will, if not already have 3rd gen Ryzen support with new BIOS and from what I was able to gather have pretty good VRM section, so should be able to handle both overclocking as well 8/12core next gen Ryzens if you want to overkill because reasons.

https://www.asus.com/News/EtaH71Hbjuio1arV

 

1TB SSD for OS and games and 2TB HDD for general storage. Potentially overspent on case, but then I like Fractal Design cases, they are both aesthetic and functional. Added fan extra as 2nd intake to "overpressurize" case, combined with filtered intake it should keep dust buildup to the minimum. Missing optical drive though.

 

At later time I might get around for richer builds

 

AlmostPCmasterrace:

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/62MVj

i5 9600k with (I think) proper motherboard and definitely proper AIO cooling to get them clocks up. RTX 2070 for solid 1440p or adequate 4k, if you're into that territory. Otherwise overkill for 1080p and its going to stay that way for few years I guess. Rest the same.

 

Hi Panocek.

 

All of the above, even the cheapo, are fine for today, and maybe even tomorrow, but I have around £1650 budget, and I'm kinda aiming for a build that satisfies me for the next 3(?) years or so.

 

I don't play many high spec games. TBH It's Wot, Rome Total War series, and ARMA, plus a few older games that even my current setup can run.

4K doesn't bother me right now, my setup at home, plus the desk space for a decent monitor, means I'm restricted on space.

I've always been the kind of guy who thinks that, as far as PC spec goes, you buy the best you can afford, even if it's overkill.

 

I'm also not over concerned about the security vulnerabilities. Personally I think it's an academic exercise that's akin to the Y2K scares. I don't think it will emerge as a real threat.

 

You have (almost) won me over to Ryzen, and you have my huge thanks for your considerable time and expertise. Can I ask one more favour, what do you think the next 3 years holds as far as progress is concerned? Do you think we will see a huge leap in CPU beyond 10nm, 7nm is already produced, but is not commercially viable, or do you think that the focus will shift to GPU utilising these smaller architectures, thereby making the GPU choice more critical?

 

Thanks again for taking the time to educate my elderly brain, it's much appreciated.

 

Regards

DiTS



Nishi_Kinuyo #16 Posted 02 June 2019 - 03:00 PM

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View PostDead_in_30_seconds, on 02 June 2019 - 02:39 PM, said:

You have (almost) won me over to Ryzen, and you have my huge thanks for your considerable time and expertise. Can I ask one more favour, what do you think the next 3 years holds as far as progress is concerned? Do you think we will see a huge leap in CPU beyond 10nm, 7nm is already produced, but is not commercially viable, or do you think that the focus will shift to GPU utilising these smaller architectures, thereby making the GPU choice more critical?

Mind you, Intel is currently still at 14nm and only recently started building a factory for 7nm.

And the upcoming Ryzen 3000-series is 7nm, so yes, commercially viable.

Afaik, the AMD Radeon VII is also 7nm, as are the upcoming RX 5700 cards.

Although for GPUs, nvidia might still be better.

Block Quote

 I'm also not over concerned about the security vulnerabilities. Personally I think it's an academic exercise that's akin to the Y2K scares. I don't think it will emerge as a real threat.

 Well, yes and no.

The entire Y2K thing was basically a scare with only a few minor issues worldwide, those Spectre thingies were basically not a threat because nobody really knew about them.

Now that the whole world knows about them, however, they likely are going to be an issue unless your system is kept up-to-date.

The Ryzen 3000-series should have a hardware fix for the one that affected AMD CPUs, while only the upcoming Intel gen (Icy Lake, 10nm) are likely to have a hardware fix for that, and even then I'm not sure if that includes the recently revealed zombieload.



Dead_in_30_seconds #17 Posted 02 June 2019 - 03:13 PM

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View PostNishi_Kinuyo, on 02 June 2019 - 02:00 PM, said:

Mind you, Intel is currently still at 14nm and only recently started building a factory for 7nm.

And the upcoming Ryzen 3000-series is 7nm, so yes, commercially viable.

Afaik, the AMD Radeon VII is also 7nm, as are the upcoming RX 5700 cards.

Although for GPUs, nvidia might still be better.

 Well, yes and no.

The entire Y2K thing was basically a scare with only a few minor issues worldwide, those Spectre thingies were basically not a threat because nobody really knew about them.

Now that the whole world knows about them, however, they likely are going to be an issue unless your system is kept up-to-date.

The Ryzen 3000-series should have a hardware fix for the one that affected AMD CPUs, while only the upcoming Intel gen (Icy Lake, 10nm) are likely to have a hardware fix for that, and even then I'm not sure if that includes the recently revealed zombieload.

 

Well Nishi, you've kinda summarised my hesitancy. As soon as you say 'Although for GPUs, nvidia might still be better.' I'm still undecided. Why do you think that Nvidia might be better?

 

EDIT:

My point about the Y2K thing was that, before the event, it was widely speculated that it would be an issue affecting the entire Universe, much like the Intel vulnerability now. Hindsight then showed us it was largely an 'academic' concern that failed to materialise. 


Edited by Dead_in_30_seconds, 02 June 2019 - 03:17 PM.


Panocek #18 Posted 02 June 2019 - 03:15 PM

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View PostDead_in_30_seconds, on 02 June 2019 - 03:39 PM, said:

 

Hi Panocek.

 

All of the above, even the cheapo, are fine for today, and maybe even tomorrow, but I have around £1650 budget, and I'm kinda aiming for a build that satisfies me for the next 3(?) years or so.

 

I don't play many high spec games. TBH It's Wot, Rome Total War series, and ARMA, plus a few older games that even my current setup can run.

4K doesn't bother me right now, my setup at home, plus the desk space for a decent monitor, means I'm restricted on space.

I've always been the kind of guy who thinks that, as far as PC spec goes, you buy the best you can afford, even if it's overkill.

 

I'm also not over concerned about the security vulnerabilities. Personally I think it's an academic exercise that's akin to the Y2K scares. I don't think it will emerge as a real threat.

 

You have (almost) won me over to Ryzen, and you have my huge thanks for your considerable time and expertise. Can I ask one more favour, what do you think the next 3 years holds as far as progress is concerned? Do you think we will see a huge leap in CPU beyond 10nm, 7nm is already produced, but is not commercially viable, or do you think that the focus will shift to GPU utilising these smaller architectures, thereby making the GPU choice more critical?

 

Thanks again for taking the time to educate my elderly brain, it's much appreciated.

 

Regards

DiTS

 

I guess its safe to say mid range cpu like Ryzen 5 or i5 8x00 series is going to be more than viable for years to come simply by virtue of cpu being next to irrelevant for 60Hz gaming while having enough spare cores/threads to use for future games to avoid hiccups. 

 

Here is humble 2c/4t G4560 paired with heavy duty graphics card. As you can see, this cpu is more than enough to deliver 4k@60fps PCmasterrrace experience... until something in the background ask for cpu attention. So unless you play in 144Hz or higher, its very easy to overspend on cpu.

 

For long term cpu, I'm curious about upcoming Ryzen 5 3600 series, which, if overclocking rumors prove to be correct with ability to hit 5GHz mark, might be next Sandy Bridge - processor with enough power in reserve in form of overclocking to stay relevant 5 years later.

 

And if you don't play "high spec games", why you need "high spec computer"? Keep in mind modern mid range graphics like RX 580/590 and GTX1660 deliver smooth experience for modern games and I guess will stay that way until new gen of consoles appear AND game developers start capitalizing on new console specs to crank up visual aspects. So for some long term investment, buy 1440p or maybe even 4k ready graphic card, pair it with mid range cpu, 16gigs of ram, quality SSD+whatever storage you need and call it a day. If leftover money still burns you in your pocket, send it to bank account for next upgrade in 4-6 years. Or in case of something dying prematurely. Or send your wife to 10/10 two weeks holidays, so you can lock yourself in mancave

 

View PostDead_in_30_seconds, on 02 June 2019 - 04:13 PM, said:

 

Well Nishi, you've kinda summarised my hesitancy. As soon as you say 'Although for GPUs, nvidia might still be better.' I'm still undecided. Why do you thinl that Nvidia might be better?

 

​As of now, when comparing similar performance cards Nvidia gets the job done for less power and thus at lower temps and/or with less noise - 1660 and RX590 provide about the same framerates, but former satisfies itself with +-120W, latter needs 175W.

Edited by Panocek, 02 June 2019 - 03:19 PM.


Dead_in_30_seconds #19 Posted 02 June 2019 - 03:29 PM

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View PostPanocek, on 02 June 2019 - 02:15 PM, said:

 

I guess its safe to say mid range cpu like Ryzen 5 or i5 8x00 series is going to be more than viable for years to come simply by virtue of cpu being next to irrelevant for 60Hz gaming while having enough spare cores/threads to use for future games to avoid hiccups. 

 

Here is humble 2c/4t G4560 paired with heavy duty graphics card. As you can see, this cpu is more than enough to deliver 4k@60fps PCmasterrrace experience... until something in the background ask for cpu attention. So unless you play in 144Hz or higher, its very easy to overspend on cpu.

 

For long term cpu, I'm curious about upcoming Ryzen 5 3600 series, which, if overclocking rumors prove to be correct with ability to hit 5GHz mark, might be next Sandy Bridge - processor with enough power in reserve in form of overclocking to stay relevant 5 years later.

 

And if you don't play "high spec games", why you need "high spec computer"? Keep in mind modern mid range graphics like RX 580/590 and GTX1660 deliver smooth experience for modern games and I guess will stay that way until new gen of consoles appear AND game developers start capitalizing on new console specs to crank up visual aspects. So for some long term investment, buy 1440p or maybe even 4k ready graphic card, pair it with mid range cpu, 16gigs of ram, quality SSD+whatever storage you need and call it a day. If leftover money still burns you in your pocket, send it to bank account for next upgrade in 4-6 years. Or in case of something dying prematurely. Or send your wife to 10/10 two weeks holidays, so you can lock yourself in mancave

 

 

​As of now, when comparing similar performance cards Nvidia gets the job done for less power and thus at lower temps and/or with less noise - 1660 and RX590 provide about the same framerates, but former satisfies itself with +-120W, latter needs 175W.

 

'And if you don't play "high spec games", why you need "high spec computer"?'

For the same reason my journey into work averages 28mph, but I have a car capable of 140mph? :)

Are you sure you're not my wife? :girl:

 

Best thread I've had in a long time, thank you. :great:

 



Panocek #20 Posted 02 June 2019 - 03:47 PM

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View PostDead_in_30_seconds, on 02 June 2019 - 04:29 PM, said:

 

'And if you don't play "high spec games", why you need "high spec computer"?'

For the same reason my journey into work averages 28mph, but I have a car capable of 140mph? :)

Are you sure you're not my wife? :girl:

 

Best thread I've had in a long time, thank you. :great:

 

 

Other way around - why I've switched 100hp motorbike into "merely" 48hp one? Cheaper to run, easier to maintain while both are blast for driving and getting through city traffic, bonus points for inability to lose driving license on first gear. New one might not break 200km/h speed, but then, anything above 150km/h is not fun to begin with on two wheels.

 

No one is stopping you from getting i7 9700k and RTX 2080. It will work like a charm. But so will mid range Ryzen and mid to high range graphics in 1080p@60Hz environment for at least few years. I've simply learned the best way of "future proofing" is simply get what you need for NOW and leave financial reserves for FUTURE and only then decide what you need to upgrade, if need at all. It would be tad a waste for i7 9700k and RTX 2080 if you were to decide you quit "modern AAA games" due to lets say increasingly over the top monetization and went back to early 2000 or even earlier titles. Or suddenly new game rendering technology would pop up, leaving older, but otherwise perfectly fine graphic cards irrelevant. Or fancypants RTX 2080 decided its good time to die two days after warranty expires:rolleyes:

 

 

Other case of failed future proofing - AMD tried to pull off multicore stunt back in 2011 with FX series of 6 and 8 core units. in 2011. Eight years ago. Meanwhile only recently games started to capitalize on more than two cores. And when you put those old 8c processors, they fail to hold the candle to much more modern 4c units. Which is why I was initially reserved to then new Ryzens with 6 cores or more. But they proved their worth, so I've nicked one for myself. After almost two years after their launch. For dirt cheap:rolleyes:


Edited by Panocek, 02 June 2019 - 04:01 PM.





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